Human Rights Day: İnsan Hakları mı dediniz?


 

Yaş 70 İş Bitmiş!

Respect for human rights, based on the principles of equality of persons before the law and non-discrimination, is an unwavering feature of the Republic of Turkey. Today, Turkey is as advanced as it has not ever been, regarding the exercise of democratic rights and freedoms. Through the reforms and arrangements realized over the past 15 years, our country has consolidated this basic feature even further.

The EU will continue to reaffirm its commitment to protect and promote the universality of human rights whenever they are violated or questioned, inside or outside its borders. The full respect of all human rights is a precondition for any democratic and resilient society, for sustainable development, security and long term peace. As the European Union, from the very beginning we have made the protection of human rights not only the foundation of our common internal and external policies, but of our Union itself. We view all human rights as universal, indivisible and interdependent, with no difference between civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights.

We have all witnessed worrying examples: freedom of expression being curtailed; discrimination being tolerated and in some cases incited; and the rule of law being applied selectively. Those who value freedom and justice cannot accept this clear erosion of individuals’ rights. The peace and stability of Europe depend on democracy, the rule of law and full respect for human rights.

The United States will be firm in representing our core democratic values and advocating for the right for all people to live in freedom.

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Cumhurbaşkanı’nın «Lozan Çıkışı…»


 

…ve «Çam Devirme»nin Eşiğinden Dönülmesi!

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EU and Turkey: 2nd HLED


 

Turkey still wants to update Customs Union deal!

The second High-level Economic Dialogue (HLED) between the EU and Turkey was held in Brussels on 8 December 2017.

Ministers and Commissioners noted that global economic growth continues to recover and that current growth prospects are encouraging. Risks to the global economy have become more balanced this year but downside risks remain sizable. The most prominent are renewed volatility in financial markets, increase in protectionism and geopolitical tensions.

We conducted a frank and amicable consultation today, during which I stressed the importance of upholding individual rights and the rule of law for the benefit of investment and economic growth. We look forward to continue our financial and economic engagement with Turkey. (Vice-President Jyrki Katainen)

Turkey remains anchored to full EU membership, which serves to the best interest of both parties. We look forward to smooth and swift upgrading of the Customs Union. Building on this fruitful exchange of views, both parties welcomed the intention to meet again in the same format next year in Turkey.(DPM Mehmet Şimşek)

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AB Ekonomisi: Beklenenin Ötesinde Gerçekleşen Büyüme…


 

…and Turkey: A risky path to sustainable growth!

The Turkish economy registered strong growth recently, helped by foreign demand, construction activity and a range of government policies from expansionary fiscal policy to credit guarantees and loosening of macro-prudential regulations. Shifting to private consumption and investment in machineries and equipment, growth will move to a more sustainable base. Downside risks are sizable, however, and include past high loan growth, inflation infused by a legacy of monetary overhang, the uncertain business environment and high unemployment.

Positive growth surprises in the first half of 2017

Broadening and more sustainable growth

 

Monetary policy complicated by high money growth

A temporary break in expansionary policy impetus

Downside risks aplenty

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Science, innovation and the digital revolution:Turkey


 

OECD: The Digital Transformation in Turkey

For decades, research in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) has aimed to produce machines with human-like cognitive functions. In 2016, Turkey was among the top 20 economies in terms of top-cited scientific publications related to machine learning illustrating its commitment to play an active role in the development of frontier technologies.

Over the past decade, business R&D increased significantly in Turkey, reaching 50% of gross domestic expenditure on R&D. Government funding of business R&D increased slightly between 2006 and 2015 but remained rather low at 0.07% of GDP.

Business funding of R&D performed by higher education institutions provides one indication of R/D in Turkey, the highest share among OECD countries.

International co-inventions are particularly hight for ICT-related patents, with about 25% of Turkey’s IPS patents featuring inventors located in at least two economies.

In Turkey, the government budget for R&D has increased by almost 80% since 2008. In 2016, nearly 30% of the budget was devoted to research in defence and space.

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Equitable educational opportunities…


 

Large gaps between the more advantaged in society and the disadvantaged!

Equitable educational opportunities can help to promote long-lasting, inclusive economic growth and social cohesion. Successful education and skills policies can empower individuals to reach their full potential and enjoy the fruits of their labour, regardless of their circumstances at birth. However, as this report shows, far too many children, students and adults from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds fall behind. In many countries, substantial learning gaps exist between students at opposite ends of the socio-economic scale, and these differences tend to increase in the transition into adulthood.

All countries have ample room for improvement to ensure better learning outcomes for all. Early childhood education has been identified as an important element in future success, and requires investment, as do family and community-based support and programmes for children from families that have not attained a high level of education and skills. In the schools, targeted support is necessary for low performers from disadvantaged backgrounds and for poorly performing schools. As for the adult population, learning should be focused on improving employability, through a combination of education and practical job training. Barriers to participation in learning need to be removed, and delivery methods need to be more innovative and flexible. Targeted support is needed for the most vulnerable members of society.

According to a new set of 12 indicators on equity in education, only a few OECD countries offer people from poor backgrounds the same opportunity to succeed as their better-off peers, notably Estonia, Japan, Korea and the Netherlands. On the other hand, in Chile, France, Israel, Poland, the Slovak Republic, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States, there are exceptionally large gaps between the more advantaged in society and the disadvantaged.

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Conseil des AFFAIRES GÉNÉRALES Mardi 12 décembre, Bruxelles


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