Black Sea Security and Turkey…


The wider Black Sea region—which brings together the littoral states plus neighbouring countries—is experiencing a rapidly shifting security environment that combines large-scale conventional military threats, internationalized civil wars and frozen conflicts, as well as weapons of mass destruction challenges. Although security in the Black Sea region has always been and remains important for Turkey.

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The wider Black Sea region—which brings together the littoral states plus neighbouring countries—is experiencing a rapidly shifting security environment that combines large-scale conventional military threats, internationalized civil wars and frozen conflicts, as well as weapons of mass destruction challenges. As such, a fragile set of states caught between the Euro-Atlantic community, on the one hand, and Russia and its allies, on the other, has emerged as a key interface between the two security communities.

The series of publications includes two policy papers; one on nuclear security in the Black Sea Region and a second on rebuilding collective security. Special attention has been paid to frozen conflicts in the region with an insights paper focused on  protracted armed conflicts such as the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and the conflicts in Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The series also contains six background papers mapping the military developments in each of the Black Sea littoral states ( Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia,  Turkey and Ukraine). Each of these states have intensified their efforts to build up their military potential after Russia’s takeover of Crimea and the start of the internationalized civil war in eastern Ukraine in 2014. 

 

Turkey’s relations with its NATO partners have deteriorated while relations with Russia have swung from friendly, to near war and back to friendly

The Black Sea region is experiencing a changing military balance. The six littoral states (Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine) intensified their efforts to build up their military potential after Russia’s takeover of Crimea and the start of the internationalized civil war in eastern Ukraine in 2014.

Although security in the Black Sea region has always been and remains important for Turkey, the current Turkish defence policy seems to be largely directed southwards, towards the Middle East. Russian–Turkish relations have been ambiguous for some years. Turkey has openly expressed concern about perceived Russian ambitions in the Black Sea region and called for a greater North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) presence there. However, Turkey’s relations with Russia have been improving since mid-2016 while its commitment to NATO appears to have weakened. [Full Paper]

 

More:

[Nuclear security in the Black Sea region: Contested spaces, national capacities and multinational potential]

[Rebuilding Collective Security in the Black Sea Region]

[Protracted armed conflicts in the post-Soviet space and their impact on Black Sea security]

[Engaging in dialogue and combatting nuclear smuggling]

[Key actions to reduce nuclear security risk in the Black Sea region]

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