Dignity and autonomy in care


 

The right of older persons !

Older persons have exactly the same rights as everyone else, but when it comes to the implementation of these rights, they face a number of specific challenges.

Les personnes âgées ont exactement les mêmes droits que toute autre personne. Pourtant, la mise en œuvre de leurs droits est entravée par plusieurs obstacles spécifiques

 

They often face age discrimination, particular forms of social exclusion, economic marginalisation due to inadequate pensions, or are more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, including from family members.

 

Ainsi, les personnes âgées sont souvent victimes d’une discrimination fondée sur l’âge, de formes particulières d’exclusion sociale et d’une marginalisation économique due à des pensions insuffisantes, et sont plus vulnérables à l’exploitation et aux abus, y compris de la part de leur propre famille.

Дневник прав человека
Право пожилых людей на достойное обращение и автономию при уходе за ними

***

Strasbourg, 18 January 2018 – “Older persons have exactly the same rights as everyone else, but when it comes to the implementation of these rights, they face a number of specific challenges”, says Nils Muižnieks, Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, in his latest Human Rights Comment published today.

Older persons have exactly the same rights as everyone else, but when it comes to the implementation of these rights, they face a number of specific challenges. For example, they often face age discrimination, particular forms of social exclusion, economic marginalisation due to inadequate pensions, or are more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, including from family members.

These challenges require specific policy responses in the context of a rapidly ageing world population, but particularly so in Europe which already has the highest median age in the world: the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 25% of Europeans will be aged 65 and older by 2050 (from 14% in 2010).   Against this background, the question of the human rights of older persons has been receiving more attention within the UN system, but also the Council of Europe, for example in the form of a Recommendation by the Committee of Ministers on the promotion of human rights of older persons adopted in 2014.

We need to acknowledge that the existence of many stereotypes about older persons as being helpless, in poor health or dependent could be a problem in itself and that it is not uncommon for older persons to defy these stereotypes: Claudio Arrau, one of the greatest concert pianists of the 20th century, continued touring, recording and extending his repertoire well into his 80s. However, it is also a reality that many of us must face increasing frailty as a natural consequence of the ageing process, sometimes together with cognitive impairment, reducing the independence that we crave and increasing the need for care. When this need is such that help is required for daily tasks, such as shopping, cooking, eating, cleaning or bathing, over a long period of time, we speak of a need for long-term care.

Long-term care

The European Social Charter, the point of reference for social rights in Europe, was the first international convention to provide specifically for care for older persons. States who have accepted Article 23 of the Revised Social Charter (or Article 4 of the 1988 Additional Protocol to the 1961 Charter) have the obligation to enable older persons to remain full members of society for as long as possible. This includes enabling them to lead independent lives in their familiar surroundings as long as they wish and are able, by adapting their housing to their state of health and by providing the health care and the services they need. For older persons living in residential institutions, states must guarantee appropriate support, while respecting privacy, and participation in decisions concerning their living conditions. Unfortunately, only 20 member states have accepted this provision to date.

As recognised by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) in May 2017 in a Resolution devoted to the question of the human rights of older persons and their comprehensive care, the access of older persons to good quality health care and long-term care remains a challenge in Europe.

The European Network of National Human Rights Institutions (ENNHRI) has been conducting a very valuable project on the human rights of older persons in long-term care since 2015. In June 2017, it published a report which took as its basis the monitoring work carried out by six of its members (the National Human Rights Institutions in Belgium, Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Lithuania and Romania). The report shows that, in spite of good practices and the hard work and dedication of many care workers, human rights concerns were found in care homes in all six countries (mirroring similar research carried out by 11 other ENNHRI members in recent years), notably due to a lack of resources and the failure to use a human rights-based approach in the design and delivery of long-term care.

Of course long-term care is not limited to residential settings and persons requiring it should be offered the possibility to choose their living arrangements, with adequate supports. Of particular relevance in this respect is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), ratified by 45 of the 47 member states of the Council of Europe and by the EU: in addition to its Article 25 on Health which acknowledges the needs of older persons, the CRPD also provides for the right to live independently and to be included in the community in its Article 19. This right, along with dignity and self-determination, must be guiding principles for the design of long-term care services, including in residential settings, where the majority of care recipients are estimated to have a form of disability.

Very worryingly, research and analyses of national policy reforms indicate that, despite the urgency of rethinking long-term care in the context of the rapidly growing ageing population of Europe, many Member States are not adequately planning for these future challenges, but are instead improvising, with short-term fixes. This is likely to further aggravate already existing problems of access to long-term care, which can sometimes be available only to those with the highest care needs or those who can afford to pay for them, as well as compromising the quality of services and the protection of the human rights and dignity of their recipients.

It is recognised that older persons are highly vulnerable to abuse, including in long-term care, the WHO estimating that at least 4 million older persons experience maltreatment in the European region every year. In a case concerning a geriatric nurse who was dismissed for having brought a criminal case against her employer alleging deficiencies in the care provided (Heinisch v. Germany, 21 July 2011), the European Court of Human Rights recognised this problem, stating that “in societies with an ever growing part of their elderly population being subject to institutional care, and taking into account the particular vulnerability of the patients concerned, who often may not be in a position to draw attention to shortcomings in the provision of care on their own initiative, the dissemination of information about the quality or deficiencies of such care is of vital importance with a view to preventing abuse”.

In this context, while the ENNHRI members collaborating for the abovementioned report did not find evidence of outright torture or deliberate abuse as such, worrying practices were detected in all six countries, raising serious concerns about upholding dignity, the right to privacy, autonomy, participation, and access to justice. These included, among many other examples, verbal and physical aggression; lack of adequate medical care, as well as overuse of medication; locking doors from the outside; disrespecting the intimacy of residents, for example by bathing them at the same time; lack of heating or insufficient food to save money; or preventing residents from making complaints. It is not excluded that some of these occurrences of neglect could potentially be serious enough as to constitute a violation of Article 3 of the ECHR (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment).

It is urgent for member states to thoroughly review, with the participation of older persons, their approach to long-term care in order to make it more human rights-based, including in the light of the Revised Social Charter (by accepting Article 23 if they have not yet done so), the 2014 Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers, and the 2017 Resolution of the PACE. In addition to providing the resources such a system requires to be accessible and affordable, states must also take account of the training needs of care professionals, as well as of informal caregivers, and ensure that the choices for older persons are maximised, for example when they wish to live in their home, while preventing social isolation (the 2003 heat wave in France which killed many older persons was a terrible wake-up call about the risks of such isolation). Particular attention should be paid to ensure regular independent monitoring of long-term care services on the basis of clear principles and rights that older persons can easily enforce themselves. I encourage member states and care givers to make full use in this process of the relevant toolkit of ENNHRI.

Palliative care

Another important aspect of the right of older persons to dignity and autonomy in care concerns palliative care. Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing life-limiting illness, mainly through pain and symptom relief, but also through psychosocial support. This is contrasted with curative medicine, for which the goals of curing an illness or extending the patient’s life come before the subjective well-being of the patient. However, palliative care and curative treatment can be administered in parallel.

While palliative care concerns persons of all ages suffering from life-limiting illnesses, such as cancer, lack of specific measures to avoid pain or to allow the terminally ill to die with dignity naturally affects older persons in a disproportionate manner, as they experience increased rates of chronic and terminal illnesses involving moderate to severe pain. This is again of concern in the European region given the projected demographic developments.

The importance of palliative care as an integral part of health services and its denial as a human rights violation are being increasingly recognised at the international level. Special Rapporteurs of the UN on Torture and on Health stated that the denial of pain relief causing severe pain and suffering may amount to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment. Within the Council of Europe, the abovementioned Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers on the human rights of older persons devoted a chapter to palliative care, providing that “any older person who is in need of palliative care should be entitled to access it without undue delay, in a setting which is consistent with his or her needs and preferences, including at home and in long-term care settings”.

However access to palliative care and pain relief remains problematic. Human Rights Watch reports that many countries in Europe are affected by shortcomings regarding palliative care, such as the lack of a palliative care policy and of pain management training of carers, as well as problems of regulation and availability of opioids. I was heartened to see that Armenia and Ukraine, where these problems caused extremely intense, needless suffering until very recently, are now making progress in the right direction. However many other countries continue to face similar problems.

When it comes to older persons more specifically, a WHO report underlined how pain is frequently underassessed for older people, in particular for persons with dementia, and pointed to a widespread failure to inform and involve patients in decision-making, lack of home care, of access to specialist services and of palliative care within residential homes. A deficient palliative care policy also leads to frequent cases where older people undergo unnecessary examinations, treatments, hospitalisations and admissions to intensive care, sometimes against their own will. This is burdensome and expensive for the patient, family and society. All member states need to have a serious rethink of their palliative care policy to address such shortcomings.

An issue that is relevant in this connection is “advance directives” or “living wills”, i.e. documents which allow one to freely express one’s will, for example as regards care planning, so that it can be respected when one is no longer in a position to express it oneself, due to the loss of consciousness or ability to make decisions. These documents are particularly relevant for older persons with degenerative illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Their value has been repeatedly recognised by the Council of Europe, but practice is extremely variable among member states. I welcome the debate that took place on this question recently in Italy, culminating in the adoption of the so-called Biotestamento Law, but such debate is necessary in many other member states.

The common thread for all these issues is the need to safeguard the dignity, autonomy and self-determination in care and treatment choices for older persons, given the specificities of their human rights situation. Many argue that this situation points to a need for a binding international legal instrument, and I am happy to note the on-going work within the UN to assess this need. I also fully endorse the recent call of the PACE for a similar assessment, with the involvement of older persons, within the Council of Europe. [Source]

Useful sources:

* European Social Charter (revised)

* United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

* Recommendation CM/Rec(2014)2 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the promotion of human rights of older persons

* Recommendation Rec(2003)24 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on the organisation of palliative care

* Recommendation CM/Rec(2009)11 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on principles concerning continuing powers of attorney and advance directives for incapacity

* Resolution 2168 (2017) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe – Human rights of older persons and their comprehensive care

* European Court of Human Rights: case of Heinisch v. Germany (2011)

* Issue Paper of the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights on the right of people with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community

* ENNHRI project on the Human Rights of Older Persons and Long-term Care – outcomes and publications

* AGE Platform Europe – Older Persons’ Self-Advocacy Handbook

* Rodrigues R., Nies H. (2013) “Making sense of differences – the mixed economy of funding and delivering long-term care”. In: Leichsenring K., Billings J. and Nies H. (eds.) Long-Term Care in Europe: Improving Policy and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, London

 

Le droit des personnes âgées à la dignité et à l’autonomie dans le cadre des soins

Strasbourg, le 18 janvier 2018 – « Les personnes âgées ont exactement les mêmes droits que toute autre personne. Pourtant, la mise en œuvre de leurs droits est entravée par plusieurs obstacles spécifiques », déclare Nils Muižnieks, Commissaire aux droits de l’homme du Conseil de l’Europe, en publiant aujourd’hui un nouvel article dans le carnet des droits de l’homme.

Les personnes âgées ont exactement les mêmes droits que toute autre personne. Pourtant, la mise en œuvre de leurs droits est entravée par plusieurs obstacles spécifiques. Ainsi, les personnes âgées sont souvent victimes d’une discrimination fondée sur l’âge, de formes particulières d’exclusion sociale et d’une marginalisation économique due à des pensions insuffisantes, et sont plus vulnérables à l’exploitation et aux abus, y compris de la part de leur propre famille.

Pour lever ces obstacles, il est nécessaire d’apporter des réponses politiques spécifiques dans le contexte du vieillissement démographique rapide qui s’observe à l’échelle de la planète, mais plus particulièrement en Europe, où l’âge médian est déjà le plus élevé du monde : selon les estimations de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), 25 % des Européens seront âgés de 65 ans ou plus d’ici à 2050 (contre 14 % en 2010). Face à cette évolution, la question des droits de l’homme des personnes âgées est examinée de plus près dans le système des Nations Unies, mais aussi au Conseil de l’Europe, par exemple sous la forme d’une recommandation du Comité des Ministres sur la promotion des droits de l’homme des personnes âgées, adoptée en 2014.

Il est nécessaire de reconnaître que l’existence de nombreux stéréotypes sur les personnes âgées, qui les présentent comme impotentes, en mauvaise santé ou dépendantes, peut être un problème en soi et que nombre de personnes âgées font mentir ces stéréotypes : par exemple, Claudio Arrau, l’un des plus grands pianistes du XXe siècle, a continué à faire des tournées, à enregistrer et à étendre son répertoire bien après ses 80 ans. Il faut cependant aussi reconnaître que, pour beaucoup d’entre nous, le processus de vieillissement entraîne naturellement une plus grande fragilité, parfois accompagnée de déficiences cognitives, ce qui réduit l’indépendance à laquelle nous tenons tant et augmente les besoins en matière de soins. Lorsqu’une aide devient nécessaire pour accomplir les actes de la vie quotidienne, comme faire les courses, cuisiner, manger, faire le ménage ou prendre un bain, et que cet état se prolonge, alors s’impose une prise en charge de longue durée.

Soins de longue durée

La Charte sociale européenne, qui est le texte de référence pour les droits sociaux en Europe, a été la première convention internationale à prévoir explicitement les soins aux personnes âgées. Les États ayant accepté l’article 23 de la Charte sociale révisée (ou l’article 4 du protocole additionnel de 1988 à la Charte de 1961) sont soumis à l’obligation de permettre aux personnes âgées de demeurer le plus longtemps possible des membres à part entière de la société. Cela suppose de leur permettre de mener une existence indépendante dans leur environnement habituel aussi longtemps qu’elles le souhaitent et que cela est possible, en adaptant leur logement à leur état de santé et en leur donnant accès aux soins de santé et aux services dont elles ont besoin. Aux personnes âgées vivant en institution, les États doivent garantir l’assistance appropriée, dans le respect de la vie privée, et la participation à la détermination de leurs conditions de vie. Malheureusement, seuls 20 États membres ont accepté cette disposition à ce jour.

Ainsi que l’Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l’Europe (APCE) l’a reconnu en mai 2017 dans une résolution consacrée à la question des droits humains des personnes âgées et de leur prise en charge intégrale, l’accès des personnes âgées à des soins de santé et à des soins de longue durée de qualité reste un défi en Europe.

Le Réseau européen des institutions nationales des droits de l’homme (ENNHRI) mène depuis 2015 un projet très intéressant sur les droits de l’homme des personnes âgées qui reçoivent des soins de longue durée. En juin 2017, le réseau a publié un rapport qui s’appuie sur le travail de suivi réalisé par six de ses membres (les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme de Belgique, de Croatie, d’Allemagne, de Hongrie, de Lituanie et de Roumanie). Le rapport montre que, malgré de bonnes pratiques et malgré les efforts et le dévouement de nombreux soignants, des problèmes de droits de l’homme ont été identifiés dans des institutions dans les six pays (ce constat avait déjà été fait lors de recherches similaires menées par 11 autres membres de l’ENNHRI il y a quelques années). Ces problèmes sont notamment imputables au manque de ressources et au défaut d’application d’une approche fondée sur les droits de l’homme à la conception et à la prestation des soins de longue durée.

Bien entendu, les soins de longue durée ne sont pas dispensés uniquement en institution et les personnes dont l’état nécessite de tels soins doivent pouvoir choisir leur milieu de vie et recevoir des aides adaptées. Des dispositions particulièrement importantes à cet égard figurent dans la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, ratifiée par 45 des 47 États membres du Conseil de l’Europe et par l’UE : en plus de reconnaître les besoins des personnes âgées dans son article 25 (intitulé « Santé »), elle énonce le droit à l’autonomie de vie et à l’inclusion dans la société dans son article 19. Ce droit, associé à la dignité et à l’autodétermination, doit orienter la conception des services de soins de longue durée, y compris en institution, où, selon des estimations, la majorité des résidents présentent une forme de handicap.

Cependant, les recherches et les analyses portant sur les réformes des politiques nationales brossent un tableau très inquiétant : malgré l’urgence de repenser les soins de longue durée face au vieillissement démographique rapide que connaît l’Europe, de nombreux États membres ne se préparent pas sérieusement à relever les futurs défis mais se contentent d’improviser, en bricolant des solutions à court terme. Ce manque d’anticipation risque d’aggraver encore les problèmes d’accès aux soins de longue durée (parfois réservés aux personnes qui ont les besoins les plus importants ou qui peuvent se payer ces soins) et de compromettre la qualité des services et la protection des droits de l’homme et de la dignité des bénéficiaires.

Il est établi que les personnes âgées sont très vulnérables aux abus, y compris dans le cadre des soins de longue durée : d’après les estimations de l’OMS, au moins 4 millions de personnes âgées sont victimes de mauvais traitements en Europe chaque année. Dans une affaire concernant une infirmière en gériatrie qui avait été licenciée après avoir engagé une action pénale contre son employeur pour carences dans les soins administrés (Heinisch c. Allemagne, 21 juillet 2011), la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme a reconnu ce problème et estimé ce qui suit : « Dans des sociétés dont une part toujours plus importante de la population âgée fait l’objet d’une prise en charge institutionnelle, la divulgation d’informations sur la qualité et les insuffisances de cette prise en charge revêt une importance capitale pour la prévention des abus en raison de la vulnérabilité particulière des patients concernés, qui ne sont pas toujours en mesure de signaler eux-mêmes les dysfonctionnements pouvant affecter les soins qui leur sont prodigués. »

Dans ce contexte, si les membres de l’ENNHRI ayant collaboré au rapport susmentionné n’ont pas relevé d’indices de torture ou d’abus délibérés, des pratiques inquiétantes ont cependant été détectées dans les six pays, ce qui soulève de sérieux doutes concernant le respect de la dignité, le droit au respect de la vie privée, à l’autonomie et à la participation, et l’accès à la justice. Parmi les nombreuses pratiques inquiétantes décrites dans le rapport figurent les suivantes : des agressions physiques et verbales ; l’absence de soins médicaux adaptés et la surmédication ; des portes verrouillées de l’extérieur ; le fait de ne pas respecter l’intimité des résidents, en donnant le bain à plusieurs résidents en même temps, par exemple ; des économies réalisées sur le chauffage ou la nourriture ; et le fait d’empêcher les résidents de soumettre des plaintes. Il n’est pas exclu que certains de ces cas de négligence soient d’une gravité telle qu’ils constituent une violation de l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants).

Il est urgent que les États membres réexaminent de manière approfondie, avec la participation des personnes âgées, leur stratégie relative aux soins de longue durée, afin de la rendre plus respectueuse des droits de l’homme, en s’inspirant notamment de la Charte sociale révisée (dont ils devraient accepter l’article 23 s’ils ne l’ont pas encore fait), de la recommandation de 2014 du Comité des Ministres et de la résolution de 2017 de l’APCE. En plus de doter leur système de soins de longue durée des ressources nécessaires pour qu’il soit accessible et d’un coût abordable, les États doivent prendre en compte les besoins de formation des professionnels concernés, ainsi que des soignants non professionnels, et veiller à ce que les personnes âgées puissent faire de véritables choix ; par exemple, si elles souhaitent rester chez elles, il faut s’attacher à éviter l’isolement social (la canicule de 2003, qui a causé de nombreux décès de personnes âgées en France, a rappelé de manière dramatique combien l’isolement pouvait être dangereux). Il faut veiller tout particulièrement à ce que les services de soins de longue durée fassent régulièrement l’objet d’un contrôle indépendant, fondé sur des droits et des principes clairs que les personnes âgées puissent facilement faire respecter elles-mêmes. J’encourage les États membres et les soignants à tirer pleinement parti de la boîte à outils de l’ENNHRI pour mener à bien ce processus.

Soins palliatifs

Les soins palliatifs représentent un autre aspect important du droit des personnes âgées à la dignité et à l’autonomie dans le cadre de leur prise en charge. Ils visent à améliorer la qualité de vie des patients et de leur famille en cas de maladie limitant l’espérance de vie, notamment en atténuant la douleur et les symptômes, mais aussi en apportant un soutien psychosocial. Cette priorité distingue les soins palliatifs de la médecine curative, qui vise d’abord à guérir la maladie ou à prolonger la vie du patient et fait passer le bien-être subjectif du patient au second plan. Il est toutefois possible d’administrer parallèlement des soins palliatifs et un traitement curatif.

Certes, les soins palliatifs concernent des personnes de tous âges atteintes de maladies limitant l’espérance de vie, dont le cancer, mais le manque de mesures spécifiques destinées à soulager la douleur ou à permettre aux malades en phase terminale de mourir dans la dignité affecte naturellement les personnes âgées de manière disproportionnée, puisque le vieillissement augmente le risque de maladie chronique ou incurable provoquant une douleur modérée à importante. Compte tenu des projections démographiques, l’Europe devrait aussi se sentir particulièrement concernée par la question des soins palliatifs.

Au niveau international se dessine une nette tendance à considérer que les soins palliatifs doivent faire partie intégrante des services de santé et que le refus de dispenser de tels soins emporte violation des droits de l’homme. Les Rapporteurs spéciaux de l’ONU sur la torture et sur la santé ont déclaré que le refus de soulager la douleur pouvait constituer un traitement cruel, inhumain ou dégradant. Au sein du Conseil de l’Europe, la recommandation susmentionnée du Comité des Ministres sur les droits de l’homme des personnes âgées comporte un chapitre consacré aux soins palliatifs, dans lequel figure la disposition suivante : « Toute personne âgée nécessitant des soins palliatifs devrait avoir le droit d’y accéder, sans retard injustifié, dans un environnement conforme à ses besoins et préférences, y compris à la maison et dans les établissements de soins de longue durée. »

Pourtant, l’accès aux soins palliatifs et aux traitements antidouleur reste problématique. Human Rights Watch signale des carences dans le domaine des soins palliatifs, qui s’observent dans de nombreux pays européens et se traduisent notamment par l’absence de politique en la matière et de formation des soignants au traitement de la douleur, ainsi que par des problèmes de réglementation et de disponibilité des opioïdes. Je constate avec satisfaction que l’Arménie et l’Ukraine, où ces problèmes causaient inutilement de grandes souffrances jusqu’à tout récemment, progressent désormais sur la bonne voie. En revanche, beaucoup d’autres pays restent confrontés à des problèmes similaires.

Concernant plus spécialement les personnes âgées, un rapport de l’OMS montre comment la douleur est fréquemment sous-évaluée chez les sujets âgés, en particulier chez les personnes atteintes de démence, et souligne qu’il est courant de ne pas informer les patients et de ne pas les associer à la prise de décisions, que l’offre de soins à domicile est insuffisante et qu’il est difficile d’avoir accès à des services spécialisés et à des soins palliatifs en institution. En outre, une politique de soins palliatifs défaillante conduit à soumettre souvent inutilement des personnes âgées à des examens, à des traitements, à des hospitalisations et à des séjours en soins intensifs, parfois contre leur gré. Ces pratiques sont pénibles et coûteuses pour le patient, pour sa famille et pour la société. Tous les États membres auraient besoin de repenser en profondeur leur politique de soins palliatifs afin de remédier à ces dysfonctionnements.

Une question importante à cet égard est celle des « directives anticipées » ou du « testament de vie ». Il s’agit de documents qui permettent à une personne d’exprimer librement sa volonté, concernant la planification des soins, par exemple, de manière à ce que sa volonté puisse être respectée lorsque cette personne ne sera plus en mesure de l’exprimer elle-même, parce qu’elle ne sera plus consciente ou plus capable de prendre des décisions. Ces documents peuvent être particulièrement utiles aux personnes âgées atteintes d’affections dégénératives comme la maladie d’Alzheimer. Leur valeur a été reconnue à maintes reprises par le Conseil de l’Europe, mais les pratiques varient considérablement d’un État membre à l’autre. Je salue la tenue récente, en Italie, d’un débat sur cette question, qui a abouti à l’adoption d’une loi sur le « testament biologique » (« biotestamento »). Un tel débat serait nécessaire dans bien d’autres États membres.

Le point commun de toutes ces questions est la nécessité de garantir aux personnes âgées la dignité, l’autonomie et l’autodétermination dans le cadre des soins et du choix du traitement, compte tenu des particularités de leur situation en matière de droits de l’homme. Beaucoup estiment que cette situation requiert l’élaboration d’un instrument juridique international à caractère contraignant. Je constate avec satisfaction que l’ONU est en train d’évaluer ce besoin. En outre, j’approuve sans réserve l’appel lancé récemment par l’APCE, qui préconise d’organiser une évaluation analogue au sein du Conseil de l’Europe, en y associant les personnes âgées. [Source]

Références :

* Charte sociale européenne (révisée)

* Convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits des personnes handicapées

* Recommandation CM/Rec(2014)2 du Comité des Ministres aux États membres sur la promotion des droits de l’homme des personnes âgées

* Recommandation Rec(2003)24 du Comité des Ministres aux États membres sur l’organisation des soins palliatifs

* Recommandation CM/Rec(2009)11 du Comité des Ministres aux États membres sur les principes concernant les procurations permanentes et les directives anticipées ayant trait à l’incapacité

* Résolution 2168 (2017) de l’Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l’Europe intitulée « Les droits humains des personnes âgées et leur prise en charge intégrale »

* Cour européenne des droits de l’homme : affaire Heinisch c. Allemagne (2011)

* Document thématique du Commissaire aux droits de l’homme du Conseil de l’Europe sur le droit des personnes handicapées à l’autonomie de vie et à l’inclusion dans la société

* ENNHRI project on the Human Rights of Older Persons and Long-term Care – outcomes and publications

* AGE Platform Europe – Older Persons’ Self-Advocacy Handbook

* Rodrigues R., Nies H. (2013) « Making sense of differences – the mixed economy of funding and delivering long-term care ». In : Leichsenring K., Billings J. et Nies H. (dir.), Long-Term Care in Europe: Improving Policy and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, Londres

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: