EU Report on Human Rights in Turkey


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[ The Country Strategy Paper 2014-2020] + [ IPA II assistance] for Turkey identifies reform and capacity building in the areas of rule of law and fundamental rights as major priorities. Under the IPA, there are several notable projects focusing on human rights, for example capacity-building projects with relevant human rights mechanisms (such as the national human rights institution, the ombudsman, the parliament, and the Bar Associations), projects on freedom of expression, and projects focusing on women’s rights and anti-discrimination. The recently adopted IPA 2015 national programme includes a EUR 17.9 million action in support of the judiciary that aims to strengthen the independence, impartiality, efficiency and administration of the judiciary. As regards fundamental rights, the programme includes a EUR 18.9 million action designed to enhance key institutions as well as to support efforts to prevent and combat violence against women and children. The home affairs action will provide support to Turkey for implementing related requirements as well as contribute to the efforts to host refugees from the conflict in Syria (EUR 112 million). A standalone action with a value of EUR 4.7 million will support the social inclusion of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Van province.

EIDHR projects in Turkey focus on the most critical human rights issues for the country, including freedom of expression and an independent media, improved access to justice, the fight against torture and impunity, the protection of and respect for cultural diversity, vulnerable groups and the rights of persons belonging to minorities, human rights education and training programmes, and enhancing political representation and participation in society, particularly for underrepresented groups (including women, LGBTI persons, Roma and youth). In December 2015, 33 projects were under way under the EIDHR Turkey Programme. Twenty-two new project contracts were signed in December 2015, for a value of EUR 3 million. The new projects cover several critical human rights areas: human rights defenders; the rights of LGBTI persons; women’s rights and countering violence against women; minorities and refugees. The EIDHR is also expected to have a role to play in the response to the Syrian crisis, working with civil society organisations on the rights of refugees, asylum seekers, internally displaced persons and migrants in general. Priorities in this area are consistent with, and complementary to, the work conducted under the IPA, the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP), and other important instruments such as the [ EU Trust Fund.]

Multi-beneficiary assistance

Under the multi-beneficiary assistance, projects under the IPA 2012 and 2013 continue to be implemented in relation to the protection and promotion of minorities (EUR 3.6 million) and the provision of regional support for inclusive education (EUR 4.6 million).

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Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION
2. Context
3. Summary of the report – 4
4. POLITICAL CRITERIA AND ENHANCED POLITICAL DIALOGUE – 7
5. Democracy – 7
6. Public administration reform – 11
7. Rule of law – 14
8. Human rights and the protection of minorities – 21
9. Regional issues and international obligations – 26
10. ECONOMIC CRITERIA – 27
11. The existence of a functioning market economy – 28
12. The capacity to cope with competitive pressure and market forces within
13. the Union – 32
14. ABILITY TO ASSUME THE OBLIGATIONS OF MEMBERSHIP – 34
15. Chapter 1: Free movement of goods – 34
16. Chapter 2: Freedom of movement for workers – 36
17. Chapter 3: Right of establishment and freedom to provide services – 36
18. Chapter 4: Free movement of capital – 37
19. Chapter 5: Public procurement – 37
20. Chapter 6: Company law – 40
21. Chapter 7: Intellectual property law – 40
22. Chapter 8: Competition policy – 41
23. Chapter 9: Financial services – 42
24. Chapter 10: Information society and media – 42
25. Chapter 11: Agriculture and rural development – 43
26. Chapter 12: Food safety, veterinary and phytosanitary policy – 44
27. Chapter 13: Fisheries – 45
28. Chapter 14: Transport policy – 46
29. Chapter 15: Energy – 47
30. Chapter 16: Taxation – 48
31. Chapter 17: Economic and monetary policy – 49
32. Chapter 18: Statistics – 50
33. Chapter 19: Social policy and employment – 51
34. Chapter 20: Enterprise and industrial policy – 53
35. Chapter 21: Trans-European networks – 54
36. Chapter 22: Regional policy and the coordination of structural instruments – 55
37. Chapter 23: Judiciary and fundamental rights – 55
38. Chapter 24: Justice, freedom and security – 69
39. Chapter 25: Science and research – 74
40. Chapter 26: Education and culture – 75
41. Chapter 27: Environment and climate change – 76
42. Chapter 28: Health and consumer protection – 78
43. Chapter 29: Customs union – 79
44. Chapter 30: External relations – 80
45. Chapter 31: Foreign, security and defence policy – 81
46. Chapter 32: Financial control – 83
47. Chapter 33 — Financial and budgetary provisions – 85
Annex I – Relations between the EU and Turkey 86
Annex II – Statistical Annex – 88

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