EU: Endocrine disruptors in the pesticides and biocides


UE: les perturbateurs endocriniens – des pesticides et biocides

CHEMICALS

Endocrine-disrupting chemical substances are substances that alter the functions of the hormonal system and consequently cause adverse effects to human health. As scientific awareness of endocrine disruptors grew, the Commission responded with a “Strategy for endocrine disruptors” in 1999. Under EU legislation on chemicals endocrine disruption is often considered specifically (Plant Protection Products, Biocidal Products, REACH, water quality legislation), or addressed through general risk assessment methodology, thus insuring a high level of protection for consumers and the environment. Many chemicals used in plant protection products or biocidal products have already been banned because of their adverse effects. This testifies to the EU’s commitment to protect citizens from risks resulting from unsafe chemical substances.

Other available languages: [DE DA ES NL IT SV PT FI EL CS ET HU LT LV MT PL SK SL BG RO HR]

***

Commission presents scientific criteria to identify endocrine disruptors in the pesticides and biocides areas

Brussels, 15 June 2016 – Today the European Commission presents criteria to identify endocrine disruptors in the field of plant protection products and biocides.

The Commission proposes to the Council and the European Parliament to adopt a strong science-based approach to the identification of endocrine disruptors and to endorse the WHO definition.

Endocrine disruptors are substances, both natural and chemical, that can alter the functions of the hormonal system and consequently cause adverse effects on people or animals. Today, the European Commission presents two draft legal acts with scientific criteria that will allow for a more accurate identification of chemical substances which are endocrine disruptors, in the plant protection products and biocides areas.

Today’s package includes:

A Communication providing an overview of the scientific and regulatory context;

an Impact Assessment Report which presents the state of science regarding different criteria to identify endocrine disruptors, and provides information on possible consequences;

and two draft legal acts – one under the Biocidal Products legislation, the other under the Plant Protection Products legislation – which set the criteria to identify endocrine disruptors.

The President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker said: “Endocrine disruptors can have serious health and environmental impacts and even if many substances containing them are already banned as a result of existing legislation on pesticides and biocides, we have to remain vigilant. The Commission is committed to ensuring the highest level of protection of both human health and the environment, which is why we are today putting forward strict criteria for endocrine disrupters – based on science – making the EU regulatory system the first worldwide to define such scientific criteria in legislation.”

The Vice-President for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness Jyrki Katainen declared: “The scientific criteria for endocrine disruptors presented today will contribute to the objectives of minimising exposure to endocrine disruptors and to bringing legal certainty. Today’s Communication outlines the issues we have considered in this process, it defines the scope of what is relevant to determining the scientific criteria, and sets out the implications of setting these criteria – for the two pieces of legislation directly concerned and for other parts of the EU regulatory framework and actions.”

Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis, said: “The scientific criteria that the Commission is presenting today guarantee that the high level of protection of human health and of the environment set in our legislation on plant protection and biocidal products is maintained. The plant protection products and biocides’ legislation are among the strictest in the world because of their prior approval system, their extensive data requirements, and their hazard approach for decision making. The Commission reinforces today its commitment to protect health of people in European Union.”

The scientific criteria endorsed by the Commission today are based on the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) definition of an endocrine disruptor, for which there is a wide consensus.

The WHO defines a substance as an endocrine disruptor if:

it has an adverse effect on human health;

it has an endocrine mode of action;

and if there is a causal link between the adverse effect and the mode of action.

The criteria endorsed today also specify how the identification of an endocrine disruptor should be carried out:

by making use of all relevant scientific evidence;

using a weight of an evidence-based approach;

and applying a robust systematic review.

The Commission Communication which accompanies the two acts providesan overview of the complex scientific and regulatory context around endocrine disruptors and describes how a scientific consensus on the definition has grown over the last years, all of which has been taken into account by the Commission in arriving at its decision. Looking beyond the criteria, the Communication sets out a number of actions where the Commission will increase its efforts to minimise exposure to endocrine disruptors, in the short-term (research and international cooperation), mid-term (test methods) and long-term (regulatory).

To ensure that swift action is taken, today the Commission is also asking the European Food Safety Authority and the European Chemicals Agency to begin looking at whether approved individual substances that show indications of being endocrine disruptors can be identified as endocrine disruptors according to the criteria in the draft texts presented today. This will also help to ensure that the two regulatory Agencies are ready to apply the criteria as presented today by the Commission, and in accordance with the applicable regulatory procedures, once the criteria enter into force.

The two draft legal acts containing the criteria now need to be adopted by the Commission under the relevant procedures. In the context of the Plant Protection Products Regulation, the draft legal text specifying the criteria will be voted by Member States. In the context of the Biocidal Products Regulation, the draft measure will be discussed in a group of experts of Member States prior to adoption by the Commission.

Both measures involve the European Parliament and the Council. In order to ensure coherence between the two acts, the Commission will present both texts simultaneously to the European Parliament and the Council for them to exercise their functions.

The Commission is also proposing to adjust the ground for possible derogations under the plant protection products legislation in order to take into account the latest scientific knowledge. The ‘hazard-based’ approach of the Pesticides Regulation will be maintained, meaning that substances are banned on the basis of hazard without taking account of the exposure. However, the grounds for possible derogations have been adjusted so they are based on scientific knowledge and make the best use of available scientific evidence including information related to exposure and risk.

Background

Endocrine-disrupting chemical substances are substances that alter the functions of the hormonal system and consequently cause adverse effects to human health. As scientific awareness of endocrine disruptors grew, the Commission responded with a “Strategy for endocrine disruptors” in 1999.

Under EU legislation on chemicals endocrine disruption is often considered specifically (Plant Protection Products, Biocidal Products, REACH, water quality legislation), or addressed through general risk assessment methodology, thus insuring a high level of protection for consumers and the environment.

Many chemicals used in plant protection products or biocidal products have already been banned because of their adverse effects. This testifies to the EU’s commitment to protect citizens from risks resulting from unsafe chemical substances.

**

La Commission présente des critères scientifiques permettant d’identifier les perturbateurs endocriniens dans le domaine des pesticides et biocides

Bruxelles, le 15 juin 2016 – La Commission européenne présente aujourd’hui des critères permettant d’identifier les perturbateurs endocriniens dans le domaine des produits phytopharmaceutiques et biocides.

La Commission propose au Conseil et au Parlement européen d’adopter une approche scientifique solide aux fins de l’identification des perturbateurs endocriniens, et d’approuver la définition de l’OMS.

Les perturbateurs endocriniens sont des substances, à la fois naturelles et chimiques, qui peuvent altérer les fonctions du système hormonal et ainsi avoir des effets indésirables sur les personnes et les animaux. Aujourd’hui, la Commission européenne présente deux projets d’actes législatifs avec des critères scientifiques qui permettront une identification plus précise des substances chimiques constituant des perturbateurs endocriniens, dans les domaines des produits phytopharmaceutiques et des biocides.

Le paquet adopté aujourd’hui comporte:

une communication donnant un aperçu du contexte scientifique et réglementaire;

un rapport d’analyse d’impact, qui présente un état des lieux des connaissances scientifiques concernant différents critères pour l’identification des perturbateurs endocriniens, assorti d’informations sur les conséquences possibles;

deux projets d’actes législatifs – l’un au titre de la législation sur les biocides, l’autre en vertu de la législation relative aux produits phytopharmaceutiques — qui fixent les critères d’identification des perturbateurs endocriniens.

Jean-Claude Juncker, président de la Commission européenne, a déclaré à ce propos: «Les perturbateurs endocriniens peuvent avoir des répercussions sanitaires et environnementales graves et nous devons rester vigilants à leur égard, même si de nombreuses substances qui les contiennent ont déjà été interdites en vertu de la législation existante sur les pesticides et les biocides. La Commission s’est engagée à assurer le niveau le plus élevé de protection de la santé humaine et de l’environnement et c’est la raison pour laquelle nous proposons aujourd’hui des critères stricts concernant les perturbateurs endocriniens – fondés sur la science – qui feront du système réglementaire de l’UE le premier dans le monde à définir ces critères scientifiques sur le plan législatif.»

Jyrki Katainen, vice-président pour l’emploi, la croissance, l’investissement et la compétitivité, a déclaré à ce propos: «Les critères scientifiques pour les perturbateurs endocriniens qui sont présentés aujourd’hui contribueront à la réalisation des objectifs d’exposition minimale auxdits perturbateurs ainsi que des objectifs de sécurité juridique. La communication d’aujourd’hui expose les questions que nous avons examinées dans ce processus, elle définit le champ d’application de ce qui est pertinent pour déterminer les critères scientifiques, et elle expose les implications de ces critères — pour les deux actes législatifs directement concernés et pour d’autres parties du cadre réglementaire et des actions de l’UE.»

Vytenis Andriukaitis, commissaire européen pour la santé et la sécurité alimentaire, a déclaré à ce propos: «Les critères scientifiques que la Commission présente aujourd’hui assurent le maintien du niveau élevé de protection de la santé humaine et de l’environnement exposés dans notre législation sur les produits phytopharmaceutiques et biocides. Les législations sur les produits phytopharmaceutiques et les biocides figurent parmi les plus strictes au monde en raison de leur système d’approbation préalable, de leurs exigences importantes en matière de données, ainsi que de leur approche en matière de risques pour la prise de décision. Aujourd’hui, la Commission réaffirme son engagement à protéger la santé des citoyens de l’Union européenne.»

Les critères scientifiques approuvés aujourd’hui par la Commission sont fondés sur la définition d’un perturbateur endocrinien de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), qui fait l’objet d’un large consensus.

L’OMS définit en effet une substance comme un perturbateur endocrinien si:

elle a des effets indésirables sur la santé humaine;

elle présente un mode d’action endocrinien;

s’il existe un lien de causalité entre l’effet indésirable et le mode d’action.

Les critères approuvés aujourd’hui précisent également de quelle manière un perturbateur endocrinien devrait être identifié:

en mettant en évidence des preuves scientifiques pertinentes;

en utilisant la pondération d’une approche fondée sur des éléments concrets;

en procédant à un examen systématique et solide.

La communication de la Commission accompagnant les deux actes donne une vue d’ensemble du contexte réglementaire et scientifique complexe dans lequel s’inscrit la question des perturbateurs endocriniens et décrit l’émergence d’un consensus scientifique sur leur définition au cours des dernières années; pour arrêter sa décision, la Commission a tenu compte de ces différents éléments. Outre les critères précités, la communication présente un certain nombre d’actions qui permettront à la Commission de redoubler d’efforts afin de réduire autant que possible l’exposition aux perturbateurs endocriniens, que ce soit à court terme (recherche et coopération internationale), à moyen terme (méthodes d’essai) et à long terme (réglementation).

Pour que des mesures soient prises rapidement, la Commission invite ce jour l’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments et l’Agence européenne des produits chimiques à commencer à examiner si différentes substances approuvées pour lesquelles des éléments indiquent qu’elles pourraient être des perturbateurs endocriniens peuvent être considérées comme telles selon les critères définis dans les projets d’actes présentés aujourd’hui. Le but est en outre de garantir que ces deux agences de régulation soient prêtes à appliquer les critères présentés aujourd’hui par la Commission dès leur entrée en vigueur, dans le respect des procédures réglementaires applicables.

Les deux projets d’actes définissant les critères doivent à présent être adoptés par la Commission selon les procédures en vigueur. Dans le contexte du règlement relatif aux produits phytopharmaceutiques, le projet de texte juridique établissant les critères sera soumis au vote des États membres. Dans celui du règlement sur les produits biocides, le projet de mesure sera examiné par un groupe d’experts des États membres avant son adoption par la Commission.

Les deux mesures supposent l’intervention du Parlement européen et du Conseil. Pour garantir la cohérence entre les actes, la Commission présentera simultanément les deux textes au Parlement européen et au Conseil afin qu’ils exercent leurs fonctions.

La Commission propose par ailleurs d’adapter les motifs de dérogation éventuelle prévus par la législation relative aux produits phytopharmaceutiques, afin de tenir compte des connaissances scientifiques les plus récentes. L’approche fondée sur la notion de danger du règlement sur les pesticides sera maintenue; elle signifie l’interdiction de substances en fonction de leur dangerosité, sans que l’exposition soit prise en compte. Toutefois, les motifs de dérogation ont été revus de sorte qu’ils reposent sur des données scientifiques et fassent le meilleur usage possible des éléments de preuve scientifiques disponibles, y compris les informations relatives à l’exposition et au risque.

Contexte

Les substances chimiques qui perturbent le système endocrinien sont des substances qui altèrent le fonctionnement du système hormonal et ont, par conséquent, des effets indésirables sur la santé humaine. La science s’intéressant de plus en plus à la question des perturbateurs endocriniens, la Commission a réagi en adoptant une «stratégie concernant les perturbateurs endocriniens» en 1999.

Dans la réglementation de l’UE sur les produits chimiques, la perturbation endocrinienne est souvent prise en compte de manière spécifique (règlement REACH et réglementation sur les produits phytopharmaceutiques, les produits biocides et la qualité de l’eau) ou est soumise à une méthodologie générale d’évaluation des risques, assurant ainsi un niveau élevé de protection des consommateurs et de l’environnement.

De nombreuses substances chimiques utilisées dans les produits phytopharmaceutiques ou biocides ont déjà été interdites en raison de leurs effets indésirables, confirmant ainsi l’engagement de l’Union à protéger les citoyens contre les risques associés à ces substances chimiques dangereuses.

**

Frequently Asked Questions: Endocrine disruptors

Other available languages: [DE DA ES NL IT SV PT FI EL CS ET HU LT LV MT PL SK SL BG RO HR]

What are endocrine disruptors (EDS)?

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals which impact on the hormone system of animals and humans. They have three cumulative characteristics: a hormonal function, an adverse effect, and a causality between the two.

P031944000102-264503

The main characteristic compared to other chemicals is that we do not only look at the effect, but also at a mode of action. In fact, endocrine disruption is a relatively recent way of looking at the toxicity of chemicals, which helps to understand how certain adverse effects happen. The usual approach to defining the toxicity of chemical substances is “end points” – whether there is an adverse effect. The new, additional, element is the concept of “mode of action”, the way in which a chemical substance has an impact.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) defined in 2002 an Endocrine Disruptor as a substance or mixture that alters function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently causes adverse health effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub) populations.

What is the issue at stake?

As awareness of endocrine disruptors grew, so did public and political interest.The Commission responded with a “Strategy for endocrine disruptors” in 1999. [Community strategy] This set out a number of actions at EU level, with the short-term (research and international cooperation), mid-term (test methods) and long-term (regulatory) steps to take. The key objective was to adopt legally-binding scientific criteria to determine what an endocrine disruptor is. The Commission worked closely with Member States, got input from EU regulatory agencies, independent scientific committees advising the Commission, the Commission’s in-house scientific body (the Joint Research Centre [Report EUR 25919] [Report EUR 26068] ), and from multilateral and bilateral scientific and regulatory cooperation with third countries, as well as extensive contacts with stakeholders over the past 15 years. [More information] The discussions have shown the complexity of the topic: so too does the fact that no other country has so far adopted legally-binding scientific criteria to determine what an endocrine disruptor is. Against this background, the Commission conducted a thorough preparation of the measures by reconfirming its unequivocal commitment to the EU co-legislators to finalise its ongoing work and present the criteria before the summer 2016.

Are endocrine disruptors (EDS) already taken into account in EU legislation?

Yes. EU regulatory agencies, independent scientific committees, the Commission and Member States already look at endocrine disruptors. This work is regulated through sectorial legislation in areas including the human health (including for consumers and workers), animal health, and the environment. Examples are the EU legislation on occupational safety and health (where the legislation on chemical agents at work [protection of the health and safety of workers from the risks related to chemical agents at work] includes all chemical agents, including endocrine disruptors), food and feed safety (where toxicological risks, including those stemming from endocrine disruptors, are subject to comprehensive risk assessment), and consumer products (including for example cosmetics and toys, REACH), as well as environmental legislation. Moreover, in the specific areas of Biocides [making available on the market and use of biocidal products] and Plant Protection Products [placing of plant protection products on the market] the legislation already determines the regulatory consequences for endocrine disruptors and interim criteria are in place so far (please see next question).

How does EU legislation regulate endocrine disruptors (EDS) in Plant Protection Products and Biocidal Products?

The EU has one of the strictest systems in the world for the assessment of Plant Protection Products (“pesticides”, e.g. herbicides) and Biocidal Products (e.g. hand disinfectants). Hundreds of substances have gone through, or are going through, a stringent scientific assessment process. The EU approval of a substance is only granted for a limited period of time (up to 15 years) and must be renewed regularly.

In practice, EU legislation requires that allchemicals used in Plant Protection Products (PPP) and Biocidal Products (BP) are approved at EU level before being placed on the market. This is called “prior approval”. It means that all chemicals are allowed on the market – and for use – only once their safe use is proved according to a thorough scientific assessment. In addition, particularly hazardous substances which do not fall under specific derogations, like substances which may cause cancer, effects on reproduction, or endocrine disruptors are not even going through this risk-assessment but are per se not approved. Finally, in case of relevant new scientific and technical knowledge, approvals can be reconsidered at any time and their status can change into non-approval or a more restrictive condition of use. Because of this “prior approval” system, the extensive data requirements, and the hazard approach for decision making, the European legislation for Plant Protection Products and Biocidal Products is considered to be one of the most solid worldwide.

“Hazard-based” and “risk-based” decision making on chemicals: what is the regulatory context?

The regulation of chemical substances can be approached in two different ways: based on hazard or based on risk. A hazard-based approach regulates substances on the basis of their intrinsic properties, without taking account of the exposure to the substance. A risk-based approach factors in the exposure. In the area of chemical safety, there are several pieces of EU legislation that apply a hazard-based approach to toxicological safety, while others follow a risk-based approach. [Generally, a risk-based approach allows more consideration of proportionality when taking regulatory] [“fitness check”, under the REFIT programme] A common analogy used is from the animal kingdom: a lion is intrinsically a hazard, but a lion safely constrained in a zoo is not a risk, since there is no exposure.

However, the issue faced by the Commission in this exercise is to establish criteria to determine what is or is not an endocrine disruptor for the purposes of plant protection products and biocidal products – not to decide how to regulate these substances.

The EU regulation of pesticides and biocides is based, for some substances (for example, carcinogens) on hazard, not on risk, subject to very limited exceptions, where a risk assessment is conducted.

What will the criteria mean for the regulatory areas of Plant Protection Products and Biocidal Products?

The EU legislation for Plant Protection Products and Biocidal Products provides that active substances which are endocrine disruptors shall not be approved, unless – in the case of Plant Protection Products – there is negligible exposure or – in the case of Biocides – a negligible risk. In principle, the question whether an active substance is an endocrine disruptor would be assessed each time the substance is subject to an approval procedure or a renewal procedure at EU level. As mentioned, all active substances used in plant protection products and biocidal products are only approved for a limited period of time, and their approvals are routinely reviewed.

It is important to stress that some of the adverse effects caused by endocrine disruptors (for instance effects on reproduction) have been the matter of assessment for many years. This, in practice, means that many substances where evidence as endocrine disruptors is available have been already banned in the EU. The new criteria will however allow for a more accurate and up to date assessment.

Will the new criteria be applied immediately?

As a general rule, and in order to ensure quick action and that recent scientific developments will be taken into account, the more accurate scientific criteria will be applied immediately. In addition, in order to allow the further scientific assessment work to start, the Commission will ask today the European Food Safety Authority (ESFA) and the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) to start already looking at individual substances – for which indications exist that they could be endocrine disruptors – to accelerate the process once the criteria are in force.

This ensures that these two regulatory Agencies are ready to apply those criteria, once these are adopted in accordance with the regulatory procedures.

What is the Commission presenting?

Two separate draft measures were endorsed by the College on the 15th of June, 2016: They specify the criteria to identify endocrine disruptors and more precisely how the identification of endocrine disruptors should be carried out:

* one delegated act containing criteria applicable to the chemical substances falling under the Biocidal Products Regulation; and

* a Commission Regulation containing criteria applicable to the chemical substances falling under the Plant Protection Products Regulation, and which will need to be adopted in accordance with the Regulatory procedure with scrutiny.

The draft measures are accompanied by a Communication on endocrine disruptors and the impact assessment report. The presentation of the criteria to identify endocrine-disrupting substances will fulfil the legal obligations under the plant protection products and. Once adopted, under the biocides legislation. Once adopted, the EU regulatory system will be the first regulatory system worldwide to define scientific criteria for endocrine disruptors in legislation confirming the Commission’s commitment to ensuring the highest level of protection of both; human health and the environment

What are the next steps in terms of procedure?

Following the presentation of today’s package, the Commission calls upon Member States and EU institutions involved in the further adoption process to work closely and constructively in order to swiftly adopt these texts.

In the context of the Plant Protection Products regulation, the draft legal text specifying the criteria should now be voted by Member States.

In the context of the Biocidal Products regulation, the draft measure will be discussed with experts from Member States prior to adoption by the Commission.

Both measures involve the European Parliament and the Council. In order to ensure coherence between the two acts, the Commission will present both texts simultaneously to the European Parliament and the Council for them to exercise their scrutiny functions.

The two drafts will also be notified to the World Trade Organisation, to allow third countries to comment on them because the criteria will also apply to products imported into the EU.

**

Foire aux questions: les perturbateurs endocriniens

Que sont les perturbateurs endocriniens?

Les perturbateurs endocriniens sont des substances chimiques qui altèrent le fonctionnement du système hormonal chez l’homme et l’animal. Ils ont trois caractéristiques cumulatives: une fonction hormonale, un effet indésirable, et un lien de causalité entre les deux.

P031944000102-264503

La principale caractéristique par rapport à d’autres substances chimiques est que non seulement les effets mais aussi le mode d’action sont pris en considération. En fait, le concept de perturbation endocrinienne reflète une approche relativement récente de la toxicité des substances chimiques, qui aide à comprendre comment se produisent un certain nombre d’effets indésirables. L’approche généralement adoptée pour définir la toxicité des substances chimiques repose sur le «point d’arrivée», c’est-à-dire sur la question de savoir si ces substances ont un effet indésirable. Le nouvel élément supplémentaire est la notion de «mode d’action», c’est-à-dire la manière dont une substance chimique exerce ses effets.

L’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) a défini, en 2002 un perturbateur endocrinien comme étant une substance ou un mélange altérant les fonctions du système endocrinien et induisant donc des effets indésirables sur la santé d’un organisme intact, de ses descendants ou (sous-) populations.

Quel est l’enjeu?

L’intérêt du public et des responsables politiques pour les perturbateurs endocriniens a grandi à mesure qu’ils ont pris conscience de leur existence.La Commission a réagi en adoptant une «stratégie concernant les perturbateurs endocriniens» en 1999 [Stratégie communautaire] . Cette stratégie décrit un certain nombre d’actions à mener au niveau de l’UE et définit les mesures à prendre à court terme (recherche et coopération internationale), à moyen terme (méthodes d’essai) et à long terme (mesures réglementaires). L’objectif principal était d’adopter des critères scientifiques juridiquement contraignants pour déterminer ce qu’est un perturbateur endocrinien. La Commission a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec les États membres, a reçu des contributions des agences de régulation de l’UE, des comités scientifiques indépendants chargés de la conseiller et de son organisme scientifique interne (le Centre commun de recherche [Rapport EUR 26068] [Rapport EUR 25919] ), et mis à profit les résultats de la coopération multilatérale et bilatérale en matière scientifique et réglementaire avec les pays tiers ainsi que les nombreux contacts qu’elle entretient avec les acteurs concernés depuis une quinzaine d’années [plus amples informations] . Ces discussions ont révélé la complexité de la question, complexité dont témoigne également le fait qu’aucun pays n’a jusqu’ici adopté de critères scientifiques juridiquement contraignants pour déterminer ce qu’est un perturbateur endocrinien. Dans ce contexte, la Commission a minutieusement préparé les mesures en réaffirmant son engagement sans équivoque auprès des colégislateurs de l’UE à finaliser les travaux en cours, qui étaient alors près de s’achever, et à présenter les critères avant l’été 2016.

Les perturbateurs endocriniens sont-ils déjà pris en compte dans la législation de l’UE?

Oui. Les agences de régulation de l’UE, les comités scientifiques indépendants, la Commission et les États membres effectuent déjà des travaux sur les perturbateurs endocriniens. Ces travaux sont régis par une législation sectorielle dans des domaines tels que la santé humaine (y compris pour les consommateurs et les travailleurs), la santé animale et l’environnement. Il s’agit notamment de la législation de l’UE concernant la sécurité et la santé sur le lieu de travail (dont la législation relative aux agents chimiques sur le lieu de travail [la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs contre les risques liés à des agents chimiques sur le lieu de travail] , qui inclut tous les agents chimiques, y compris les perturbateurs endocriniens), la sécurité des denrées alimentaires et des aliments pour animaux (les risques toxicologiques, y compris ceux découlant des perturbateurs endocriniens, y font l’objet d’une évaluation globale des risques) et les produits de consommation (notamment les cosmétiques et les jouets, REACH), ainsi que de la législation environnementale. De plus, dans les domaines spécifiques des biocides [la mise à disposition sur le marché et l’utilisation des produits biocides] et des produits phytopharmaceutiques [la mise sur le marché des produits phytopharmaceutiques] , la législation définit déjà les conséquences réglementaires pour les perturbateurs endocriniens et des critères provisoires sont actuellement en place (voir question suivante).

Comment les perturbateurs endocriniens contenus dans les produits phytopharmaceutiques et les produits biocides sont-ils réglementés dans la législation de l’UE?

L’UE dispose de l’un des systèmes les plus stricts au monde pour l’évaluation des produits phytopharmaceutiques («pesticides», dont herbicides) et des produits biocides (par ex. désinfectants pour les mains). Des centaines de substances sont soumises actuellement à une procédure stricte d’évaluation scientifique. L’approbation UE d’une substance n’est accordée que pour une période de temps limitée (jusqu’à 15 ans) et doit être renouvelée régulièrement.

Dans la pratique, la législation de l’UE exige que toutes les substances chimiques utilisées dans les produits phytopharmaceutiques et les produits biocides soient approuvées à l’échelle de l’UE avant leur mise sur le marché. C’est ce que l’on appelle l’«approbation préalable». Cela signifie que toutes les substances ne sont autorisées sur le marché — et ne peuvent être utilisées — que lorsque la sécurité de leur utilisation a été prouvée conformément à une évaluation scientifique approfondie. Qui plus est, pour les substances particulièrement dangereuses qui ne relèvent pas de dérogations spécifiques (comme les substances cancérogènes, celles qui ont des effets sur la reproduction ou les perturbateurs endocriniens), aucune évaluation des risques n’est effectuée, l’approbation étant refusée d’office. Enfin, si de nouvelles connaissances scientifiques et techniques deviennent disponibles, les approbations peuvent être réexaminées à tout moment et retirées ou soumises à des conditions d’utilisation plus restrictives. En raison de ce système «d’autorisation préalable», de ses nombreuses exigences en matière de données et du choix d’une approche fondée sur les dangers pour la prise de décision, la législation européenne concernant les produits phytopharmaceutiques et les produits biocides est considérée comme l’une des plus solides à l’échelle mondiale.

Prise de décisions pour les substances chimiques «fondée sur les dangers» ou «fondée sur les risques»: quel est le cadre réglementaire?

La réglementation des substances chimiques peut être envisagée de deux manières différentes: sur la base des dangers ou sur la base des risques. Une approche fondée sur les dangers réglemente les substances en fonction de leurs propriétés intrinsèques, sans tenir compte de l’exposition à la substance. Une approche fondée sur les risques prend en compte cette exposition. Dans le domaine de la sécurité chimique, plusieurs actes législatifs de l’UE appliquent une approche fondée sur les dangers en matière de sécurité toxicologique, tandis que d’autres suivent une approche fondée sur les risques [D’une manière générale, une approche fondée sur les risques permet de prendre davantage en compte la proportionnalité dans le cadre de la prise de décisions réglementaires (en matière de gestion des risques).] [bilan de qualité dans le cadre du programme REFIT] . Une analogie tirée du règne animal est couramment utilisée: un lion représente intrinsèquement un danger, mais un lion enfermé dans un zoo n’est pas un risque, puisqu’il n’y a pas d’exposition.

Cependant, l’objectif de la Commission au cours de cet exercice est d’établir des critères visant à déterminer ce qui constitue ou non un perturbateur endocrinien en ce qui concerne les produits phytopharmaceutiques et les produits biocides – et non de décider de quelle manière ces substances doivent être réglementées.

La législation de l’UE sur les pesticides et les biocides se fonde, pour certaines substances (par exemple, les substances cancérigènes) sur la notion de danger et non de risque, à de rares exceptions près pour lesquelles une évaluation des risques est effectuée.

Que recouvreront les critères pour les domaines réglementaires liés aux produits biocides et aux produits phytopharmaceutiques?

La législation de l’UE relative aux produits phytopharmaceutiques et aux produits biocides prévoit que les substances actives qui sont des perturbateurs endocriniens ne sont pas approuvées, sauf en cas d’exposition négligeable (dans le cas des produits phytopharmaceutiques) ou en cas de risque négligeable (dans le cas des biocides). En principe, la question de savoir si une substance active est un perturbateur endocrinien serait évaluée chaque fois que cette substance fait l’objet d’une procédure d’agrément ou de renouvellement au niveau de l’UE. Comme déjà mentionné plus haut, toutes les substances actives utilisées dans les produits phytopharmaceutiques et dans les produits biocides ne sont approuvées que pour une durée limitée et leur approbation est régulièrement réexaminée.

Il est important de souligner que certains des effets indésirables causés par les perturbateurs endocriniens (par exemple les effets sur la reproduction) sont évalués depuis de nombreuses années, ce qui signifie que, dans la pratique, un grand nombre de substances établies comme étant des perturbateurs endocriniens ont déjà été interdites dans l’UE. Les nouveaux critères permettront cependant d’effectuer une évaluation plus précise et plus actualisée.

Les nouveaux critères s’appliqueront-ils immédiatement?

En règle générale, et afin de pouvoir réagir vite et prendre en compte les développements scientifiques récents, les critères scientifiques plus précis seront appliqués immédiatement. Par ailleurs, pour permettre aux travaux d’évaluation scientifique de démarrer, la Commission demandera ce jour à l’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA) et à l’Agence européenne des produits chimiques (ECHA) de commencer à examiner les substances pour lesquelles des éléments indiquent qu’elles pourraient être considérées comme des perturbateurs endocriniens, afin que les choses aillent plus vite une fois que les critères seront en vigueur.

Ainsi, ces deux agences de régulation seront prêtes à appliquer les critères dès que ceux-ci seront adoptés conformément aux procédures réglementaires.

Qu’est-ce que la Commission présente aujourd’hui?

Deux projets de mesures distincts ont été approuvés par le collège le 15 juin 2016; ils établissent les critères permettant d’identifier les perturbateurs endocriniens et, plus précisément, de déterminer comment cette identification devrait avoir lieu:

* un acte délégué contenant des critères applicables aux substances chimiques relevant du champ d’application du règlement sur les produits biocides; et

* un règlement de la Commission contenant des critères applicables aux substances chimiques relevant du règlement sur les produits phytopharmaceutiques, et qui devra être adopté conformément à la procédure de réglementation avec contrôle.

Les projets de mesures sont accompagnés d’une communication sur les perturbateurs endocriniens et d’un rapport d’analyse d’impact. La proposition de critères pour l’identification des substances perturbant le système endocrinien permettra de remplir les obligations légales au titre de la législation relative aux produits phytopharmaceutiques et, une fois ces critères adoptés, au titre de la législation sur les biocides. Le cadre réglementaire de l’UE serait ainsi le premier au monde à définir dans la législation des critères scientifiques applicables aux perturbateurs endocriniens, confirmant ainsi l’engagement de la Commission à garantir le niveau de protection le plus élevé à la fois pour la santé humaine et pour l’environnement.

Quelles sont les prochaines étapes sur le plan de la procédure?

Après la présentation de ce train de mesures aujourd’hui, la Commission invite les États membres et les institutions de l’UE associées au processus d’adoption à collaborer étroitement et de manière constructive en vue d’adopter rapidement ces textes.

Dans le contexte du règlement relatif aux produits phytopharmaceutiques, le projet de texte juridique établissant les critères devrait être à présent voté par les États membres.

Dans le contexte du règlement sur les produits biocides, le projet de mesure sera discuté avec des experts des États membres avant son adoption par la Commission.

Les deux mesures font intervenir le Parlement européen et le Conseil. Pour garantir la cohérence entre les deux actes, la Commission présentera simultanément les deux textes au Parlement européen et au Conseil afin qu’ils exercent leurs fonctions de contrôle.

Les deux projets seront également notifiés à l’Organisation mondiale du commerce, pour permettre aux pays tiers de s’exprimer à ce sujet, étant donné que les critères s’appliqueront également aux produits importés dans l’UE.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: