EU + Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & Microsoft: Code of Conduct on illegal online hate speech


UE + Facebook, Twitter, YouTube et Microsoft: Un code de conduite relatif aux discours haineux illégaux en ligne

hate_speech

[Verhaltenskodex zur Bekämpfung illegaler Hassrede im Internet]

[IT SV FI EL CS HU LT MT PL SK RO HR]

***

The Commission together with Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft (“the IT companies”) today unveil a code of conduct that includes a series of commitments to combat the spread of illegal hate speech online in Europe.

The IT Companies support the European Commission and EU Member States in the effort to respond to the challenge of ensuring that online platforms do not offer opportunities for illegal online hate speech to spread virally. They share, together with other platforms and social media companies, a collective responsibility and pride in promoting and facilitating freedom of expression throughout the online world. However, the Commission and the IT Companies recognise that the spread of illegal hate speech online not only negatively affects the groups or individuals that it targets, it also negatively impacts those who speak out for freedom, tolerance and non-discrimination in our open societies and has a chilling effect on the democratic discourse on online platforms.

In order to prevent the spread of illegal hate speech, it is essential to ensure that relevant national laws transposing the Council Framework Decision on combating racism and xenophobia are fully enforced by Member States in the online as well as the in the offline environment. While the effective application of provisions criminalising hate speech is dependent on a robust system of enforcement of criminal law sanctions against the individual perpetrators of hate speech, this work must be complemented with actions geared at ensuring that illegal hate speech online is expeditiously reviewed by online intermediaries and social media platforms, upon receipt of a valid notification, in an appropriate time-frame. To be considered valid in this respect, a notification should not be insufficiently precise or inadequately substantiated.

Vĕra Jourová, EU Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, said, “The recent terror attacks have reminded us of the urgent need to address illegal online hate speech. Social media is unfortunately one of the tools that terrorist groups use to radicalise young people and racist use to spread violence and hatred. This agreement is an important step forward to ensure that the internet remains a place of free and democratic expression, where European values and laws are respected. I welcome the commitment of worldwide IT companies to review the majority of valid notifications for removal of illegal hate speech in less than 24 hours and remove or disable access to such content, if necessary.”

Twitter’s Head of Public Policy for Europe, Karen White, commented: “Hateful conduct has no place on Twitter and we will continue to tackle this issue head on alongside our partners in industry and civil society. We remain committed to letting the Tweets flow. However, there is a clear distinction between freedom of expression and conduct that incites violence and hate. In tandem with actioning hateful conduct that breaches Twitter’s Rules, we also leverage the platform’s incredible capabilities to empower positive voices, to challenge prejudice and to tackle the deeper root causes of intolerance. We look forward to further constructive dialogue between the European Commission, member states, our partners in civil society and our peers in the technology sector on this issue.”

Google’s Public Policy and Government Relations Director, Lie Junius, said: “We’re committed to giving people access to information through our services, but we have always prohibited illegal hate speech on our platforms. We have efficient systems to review valid notifications in less than 24 hours and to remove illegal content. We are pleased to work with the Commission to develop co- and self-regulatory approaches to fighting hate speech online.”

Monika Bickert, Head of Global Policy Management at Facebook said: “We welcome today’s announcement and the chance to continue our work with the Commission and wider tech industry to fight hate speech. With a global community of 1.6 billion people we work hard to balance giving people the power to express themselves whilst ensuring we provide a respectful environment. As we make clear in our Community Standards, there’s no place for hate speech on Facebook. We urge people to use our reporting tools if they find content that they believe violates our standards so we can investigate. Our teams around the world review these reports around the clock and take swift action.”

John Frank, Vice President EU Government Affairs at Microsoft, added: “We value civility and free expression, and so our terms of use prohibit advocating violence and hate speech on Microsoft-hostedconsumer services. We recently announced additional steps to specifically prohibit the posting of terrorist content. We will continue to offer our users a way to notify us when they think that our policy is being breached. Joining the Code of Conduct reconfirms our commitment to this important issue.”

By signing this code of conduct, the IT companies commit to continuing their efforts to tackle illegal hate speech online. This will include the continued development of internal procedures and staff training to guarantee that they review the majority of valid notifications for removal of illegal hate speech in less than 24 hours and remove or disable access to such content, if necessary. The IT companies will also endeavour to strengthen their ongoing partnerships with civil society organisations who will help flag content that promotes incitement to violence and hateful conduct. The IT companies and the European Commission also aim to continue their work in identifying and promoting independent counter-narratives, new ideas and initiatives, and supporting educational programs that encourage critical thinking.

The IT Companies also underline that the present code of conduct is aimed at guiding their own activities as well as sharing best practices with other internet companies, platforms and social media operators.

The code of conduct includes the following public commitments:

* The IT Companies, taking the lead on countering the spread of illegal hate speech online, have agreed with the European Commission on a code of conduct setting the following public commitments:

* The IT Companies to have in place clear and effective processes to review notifications regarding illegal hate speech on their services so they can remove or disable access to such content. The IT companies to have in place Rules or Community Guidelines clarifying that they prohibit the promotion of incitement to violence and hateful conduct.

* Upon receipt of a valid removal notification, the IT Companies to review such requests against their rules and community guidelines and where necessary national laws transposing the Framework Decision 2008/913/JHA, with dedicated teams reviewing requests.

* The IT Companies to review the majority of valid notifications for removal of illegal hate speech in less than 24 hours and remove or disable access to such content, if necessary.

* In addition to the above, the IT Companies to educate and raise awareness with their users about the types of content not permitted under their rules and community guidelines. The use of the notification system could be used as a tool to do this.

* The IT companies to provide information on the procedures for submitting notices, with a view to improving the speed and effectiveness of communication between the Member State authorities and the IT Companies, in particular on notifications and on disabling access to or removal of illegal hate speech online. The information is to be channelled through the national contact points designated by the IT companies and the Member States respectively. This would also enable Member States, and in particular their law enforcement agencies, to further familiarise themselves with the methods to recognise and notify the companies of illegal hate speech online.

* The IT Companies to encourage the provision of notices and flagging of content that promotes incitement to violence and hateful conduct at scale by experts, particularly via partnerships with CSOs, by providing clear information on individual company Rules and Community Guidelines and rules on the reporting and notification processes. The IT Companies to endeavour to strengthen partnerships with CSOs by widening the geographical spread of such partnerships and, where appropriate, to provide support and training to enable CSO partners to fulfil the role of a “trusted reporter” or equivalent, with due respect to the need of maintaining their independence and credibility.

* The IT Companies rely on support from Member States and the European Commission to ensure access to a representative network of CSO partners and “trusted reporters” in all Member States helping to help provide high quality notices. IT Companies to make information about “trusted reporters” available on their websites.

* The IT Companies to provide regular training to their staff on current societal developments and to exchange views on the potential for further improvement.

* The IT Companies to intensify cooperation between themselves and other platforms and social media companies to enhance best practice sharing.

* The IT Companies and the European Commission, recognising the value of independent counter speech against hateful rhetoric and prejudice, aim to continue their work in identifying and promoting independent counter-narratives, new ideas and initiatives and supporting educational programs that encourage critical thinking.

* The IT Companies to intensify their work with CSOs to deliver best practice training on countering hateful rhetoric and prejudice and increase the scale of their proactive outreach to CSOs to help them deliver effective counter speech campaigns. The European Commission, in cooperation with Member States, to contribute to this endeavour by taking steps to map CSOs’ specific needs and demands in this respect.

* The European Commission in coordination with Member States to promote the adherence to the commitments set out in this code of conduct also to other relevant platforms and social media companies.

The IT Companies and the European Commission agree to assess the public commitments in this code of conduct on a regular basis, including their impact. They also agree to further discuss how to promote transparency and encourage counter and alternative narratives. To this end, regular meetings will take place and a preliminary assessment will be reported to the High Level Group on Combating Racism, Xenophobia and all forms of intolerance by the end of 2016.

Background

The Commission has been working with social media companies to ensure that hate speech is tackled online similarly to other media channels.

The e-Commerce Directive (article 14) has led to the development of take-down procedures, but does not regulate them in detail. A “notice-and-action” procedure begins when someone notifies a hosting service provider – for instance a social network, an e-commerce platform or a company that hosts websites – about illegal content on the internet (for example, racist content, child abuse content or spam) and is concluded when a hosting service provider acts against the illegal content.

Following the EU Colloquium on Fundamental Rights in October 2015 on ‘Tolerance and respect: preventing and combating Antisemitic and anti-Muslim hatred in Europe’, the Commission initiated a dialogue with IT companies, in cooperation with Member States and civil society, to see how best to tackle illegal online hate speech which spreads violence and hate.

The recent terror attacks and the use of social media by terrorist groups to radicalise young people have given more urgency to tackling this issue.

The Commission already launched in December 2015 the EU Internet Forum to protect the public from the spread of terrorist material and terrorist exploitation of communication channels to facilitate and direct their activities. The Joint Statement of the extraordinary Justice and Home Affairs Council following the Brussels terrorist attacks underlined the need to step up work in this field and also to agree on a Code of Conduct on hate speech online.

The Framework Decision on Combatting Racism and Xenophobia criminalises the public incitement to violence or hatred directed against a group of persons or a member of such a group defined by reference to race, colour, religion, descent or national or ethnic origin. This is the legal basis for defining illegal online content.

Freedom of expression is a core European value which must be preserved. The European Court of Human Rights set out the important distinction between content that “offends, shocks or disturbs the State or any sector of the population” and content that contains genuine and serious incitement to violence and hatred. The Court has made clear that States may sanction or prevent the latter.

*

For more information:

*

Bruxelles, le 31 mai 2016 – La Commission rend public aujourd’hui, avec Facebook, Twitter, YouTube et Microsoft (les «entreprises des technologies de l’information», ou «entreprises des TI»), un code de conduite comprenant une série d’engagements pour lutter contre la diffusion en ligne de discours de haine illégaux en Europe.

Les entreprises des TI soutiennent les efforts déployés par la Commission européenne et les États membres de l’UE pour relever le défi consistant à garantir que les plateformes en ligne n’offrent pas de possibilités de propagation virale des discours haineux illégaux diffusés en ligne. Elles partagent, avec d’autres plateformes et d’autres entreprises actives dans le domaine des médias sociaux, la responsabilité collective et l’honneur de promouvoir et de faciliter la liberté d’expression dans le monde en ligne. Toutefois, la Commission et les entreprises des TI reconnaissent que la propagation des discours haineux illégaux en ligne a des répercussions négatives non seulement sur les groupes ou les personnes qu’ils visent, mais aussi sur ceux qui s’expriment en faveur de la liberté, de la tolérance et de la non-discrimination dans nos sociétés ouvertes, et nuit au discours démocratique sur les plateformes en ligne.

Pour empêcher la propagation des discours haineux illégaux en ligne, il est essentiel que les lois nationales qui transposent la décision-cadre du Conseil sur la lutte contre le racisme et la xénophobie soient pleinement appliquées par les États membres dans l’environnement tant en ligne que hors ligne. Si l’application effective des dispositions qui criminalisent les discours haineux dépend de l’existence d’un système solide d’application de sanctions pénales aux auteurs de ce type de discours, elle doit être complétée par des actions visant à garantir que, dès réception d’un signalement valide, les intermédiaires en ligne et les plateformes de médias sociaux examinent rapidement, dans un délai approprié, les contenus signalés en tant que discours haineux en ligne. Pour être considéré comme valide dans ce contexte, un signalement ne devrait pas être trop imprécis ou indûment justifié. »

Vĕra Jourová, commissaire européenne pour la justice, les consommateurs et l’égalité des genres, a déclaré: «Les récentes attaques terroristes nous rappellent à quel point il est urgent de lutter contre les discours de haine en ligne. Les médias sociaux font malheureusement partie des moyens utilisés par les groupes terroristes pour radicaliser des jeunes, et par les racistes pour répandre la violence et la haine. L’accord conclu constitue une avancée importante pour qu’Internet reste un lieu d’expression libre et démocratique, dans lequel les valeurs et les législations européennes sont respectées. Je me félicite de l’engagement pris par les leaders mondiaux des technologies de l’information d’examiner la majorité des signalements valides en moins de 24 heures et, s’il y a lieu, de retirer les contenus visés ou d’en bloquer l’accès. »

Karen White, responsable de la politique publique pour l’Europe chez Twitter, a commenté l’accord: Les comportements haineux n’ont pas leur place sur Twitter, et nous continuerons à les combattre aux côtés de nos partenaires dans le secteur d’activité et la société civile. Nous restons déterminés à laisser se poursuivre la circulation des tweets. Toutefois, il y a une distinction nette à faire entre la liberté d’expression et les comportements incitant à la violence et à la haine. Parallèlement aux mesures visant à faire cesser les comportements haineux qui enfreignent les règles de Twitter, nous mobilisons aussi les capacités incroyables que recèle la plateforme pour permettre aux voix positives de se faire entendre, dénoncer les préjugés et s’attaquer aux causes profondes de l’intolérance. Nous comptons bien poursuivre le dialogue constructif qui s’est engagé sur cette problématique entre la Commission européenne, les États membres, nos partenaires de la société civile et les autres entreprises du secteur.»

Au nom de Google, Lie Junius, directeur de la politique publique et des relations avec les autorités gouvernementales, a déclaré: «Nous sommes déterminés à permettre aux utilisateurs d’accéder à l’information en utilisant nos services, mais nous avons toujours interdit les discours haineux illégaux sur nos plateformes. Nous disposons de systèmes efficaces pour examiner les signalements valides en moins de 24 heures et supprimer les contenus illégaux. Nous sommes heureux de collaborer avec la Commission pour mettre au point des approches de corégulation et d’autorégulation visant à lutter contre les discours de haine en ligne.»

Monika Bickert, responsable de la politique du réseau Facebook à l’échelle mondiale, a déclaré: «Nous nous félicitons de l’annonce faite aujourd’hui et nous nous réjouissons de poursuivre nos travaux avec la Commission et le secteur des technologies en général pour lutter contre les discours haineux. Avec une communauté mondiale comptant 1,6 milliard d’utilisateurs, nous faisons le maximum pour préserver l’équilibre entre la possibilité donnée aux personnes de s’exprimer et notre souci d’offrir un environnement respectueux. Les normes de notre communauté précisent clairement que les discours de haine n’ont pas leur place sur Facebook. Nous enjoignons à chacun d’utiliser nos outils de signalement pour nous informer de contenus qui semblent violer ces normes afin que nous puissions enquêter. Nos équipes du monde entier assurent un suivi permanent de ces signalements et interviennent rapidement.»

John Frank, vice président chargé des affaires européennes chez Microsoft, a ajouté: «En raison de notre attachement aux valeurs de la courtoisie et de la liberté d’expression, nos règles d’utilisation interdisent l’apologie de la violence et les discours haineux dans les services aux consommateurs hébergés par Microsoft. Nous avons récemment annoncé des mesures supplémentaires pour interdire expressément la mise en ligne de contenus à caractère terroriste. Nous continuerons d’offrir à nos utilisateurs les moyens de nous avertir lorsqu’ils soupçonnent une atteinte à notre politique. En adhérant au code de conduite, nous réaffirmons notre détermination à lutter contre ce problème important.»

Les entreprises des technologies de l’information signataires de ce code de conduite s’engagent à continuer la lutte contre les discours de haine illégaux en ligne. Elles poursuivront notamment la mise au point de procédures internes et assureront la formation du personnel pour que la majorité des signalements valides puissent être examinés en moins de 24 heures et, s’il y a lieu, pour retirer les contenus visés ou en bloquer l’accès. Les entreprises concernées s’efforceront aussi de renforcer leurs partenariats actuels avec les organisations de la société civile, lesquelles contribueront à signaler les contenus favorisant les incitations à la violence et à la haine. Par ailleurs, les entreprises des technologies de l’information et la Commission européenne entendent poursuivre leurs travaux pour élaborer et promouvoir des contre-discours indépendants, ainsi que des idées et des initiatives nouvelles, et pour soutenir les programmes éducatifs qui encouragent l’esprit critique.

Les entreprises des technologies de l’information soulignent enfin que le présent code de conduite a pour objectif d’orienter leurs activités et de partager les bonnes pratiques avec d’autres entreprises, plateformes et opérateurs de médias sociaux présents sur l’internet.

Le code de conduite définit les engagements publics suivants:

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information, agissant en fer de lance contre la propagation des discours haineux illégaux en ligne, sont convenues avec la Commission européenne d’un code de conduite qui définit les engagements publics ci-après:

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information mettent en place des procédures claires et efficaces d’examen des signalements de discours haineux illégaux diffusés via leurs services de manière à pouvoir retirer les contenus concernés ou à en bloquer l’accès. Elles établissent des règles ou des lignes directrices internes précisant qu’elles interdisent la promotion de l’incitation à la violence et aux comportements haineux.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information examinent, dès leur réception, les signalements valides visant au retrait d’un discours haineux illégal en ligne à l’aune de leurs règles et lignes directrices internes et, si nécessaire, des lois nationales transposant la décision-cadre 2008/913/JAI, et confient cet examen à des équipes spécialisées.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information examinent la majorité des signalements valides en moins de 24 heures et, s’il y a lieu, retirent les contenus visés ou en bloquent l’accès.

* De plus, les entreprises des technologies de l’information informent leurs utilisateurs et les sensibilisent aux types de contenus qui ne sont pas autorisés en vertu de leurs règles et lignes directrices internes. Elles pourraient, pour ce faire, utiliser le système de signalement.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information fournissent des informations sur les procédures de signalement, afin d’accélérer et d’améliorer la communication avec les autorités des États membres, notamment en ce qui concerne les signalements et le blocage de l’accès à des discours haineux illégaux en ligne ou le retrait de ceux-ci. Les informations transiteront par les points de contact nationaux respectivement désignés par les entreprises des technologies de l’information et les États membres. Cela permettra aussi aux États membres et, en particulier, à leurs services chargés de faire respecter la loi, de se familiariser davantage avec les méthodes utilisées pour reconnaître les discours haineux illégaux en ligne et les signaler aux entreprises.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information s’emploient à faire en sorte qu’une grande partie des signalements de contenus incitant à la violence et aux comportements haineux proviennent d’experts, notamment au moyen de partenariats avec des OSC, en fournissant des informations claires sur leurs règles et lignes directrices internes et sur les règles applicables aux procédures de déclaration et de signalement. Elles s’efforcent de renforcer les partenariats avec les OSC en élargissant la portée géographique de ces derniers et, s’il y a lieu, en soutenant les OSC partenaires et en les formant au rôle de «rapporteur de confiance» ou équivalent, en tenant dûment compte de la nécessité de préserver leur indépendance et leur crédibilité.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information comptent sur le soutien des États membres et de la Commission européenne pour pouvoir accéder à un réseau représentatif d’OSC partenaires et de «rapporteurs de confiance» dans tous les États membres, ce qui les aidera à fournir des signalements de grande qualité. Elles publient, sur leurs sites internet, des informations sur les «rapporteurs de confiance».

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information forment régulièrement leur personnel aux évolutions actuelles de la société et procèdent à des échanges de vues sur les possibilités d’amélioration.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information intensifient la coopération entre elles et avec d’autres plateformes et d’autres entreprises actives dans le domaine des médias sociaux pour renforcer les échanges de bonnes pratiques.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information et la Commission européenne, conscientes de la valeur des voix indépendantes qui s’élèvent contre la rhétorique haineuse et les préjudices causés par celle-ci, entendent poursuivre leurs travaux pour élaborer et promouvoir des contre-discours indépendants, ainsi que des idées et des initiatives nouvelles, et pour soutenir les programmes éducatifs qui encouragent l’esprit critique.

* Les entreprises des technologies de l’information intensifient leur coopération avec les OSC pour les former aux bonnes pratiques de lutte contre la rhétorique haineuse et les préjudices causés par celle-ci et utilisent davantage leur capacité d’atteindre les utilisateurs pour aider les OSC à mener des campagnes efficaces de contre-discours. La Commission européenne, en coopération avec les États membres, contribue à cet effort en prenant des mesures visant à cartographier les besoins et les demandes spécifiques des OSC dans ce domaine.

* La Commission européenne, en coordination avec les États membres, encourage également les autres plateformes et les autres entreprises actives dans le domaine des médias sociaux à adhérer aux engagements énoncés dans le présent code de conduite.

Les entreprises des technologies de l’information et la Commission européenne conviennent d’évaluer régulièrement les engagements énoncés dans le présent code de conduite, notamment pour en apprécier les effets. Elles conviennent également de poursuivre les discussions sur la manière de promouvoir la transparence et d’encourager les contre-discours. À cette fin, des réunions seront régulièrement organisées et une évaluation préliminaire sera communiquée, d’ici la fin de 2016, au groupe de haut niveau sur le racisme, la xénophobie et d’autres formes d’intolérance.

Contexte

La Commission collabore avec les entreprises actives dans le domaine des médias sociaux pour traquer les propos haineux de la même manière sur les réseaux en ligne que dans les autres médias.

La directive sur le commerce électronique (article 14) a conduit à l’élaboration de procédures de retrait, sans toutefois les réglementer en détail. Une procédure de notification et d’action débute lorsqu’une personne informe un fournisseur de services d’hébergement, par exemple un réseau social, une plateforme de commerce électronique ou une entreprise hébergeant des sites internet, de la présence de contenus illégaux sur Internet (contenus racistes, contenus pédopornographiques, messages indésirables, etc.) et s’achève lorsque le fournisseur de services d’hébergement prend des mesures contre le contenu dénoncé.

À la suite du colloque de l’UE sur les droits fondamentaux d’octobre 2015 sur le thème «Tolérance et respect:prévention et lutte contre la haine antisémite et islamophobe en Europe», la Commission a amorcé un dialogue avec les entreprises du secteur informatique, en coopération avec les États membres et la société civile, afin de définir la meilleure stratégie de lutte contre les discours de haine illégaux qui répandent la haine et la violence sur les réseaux en ligne.

Les récentes attaques terroristes et l’utilisation des médias sociaux par les groupes terroristes pour radicaliser les jeunes ont conféré une urgence particulière à ce dossier.

La Commission a déjà lancé en décembre 2015 le forum Internet de l’UE pour protéger le public contre la propagation des contenus à caractère terroriste et contre l’exploitation des moyens de communication pour faciliter et organiser les activités terroristes. Dans sa déclaration conjointe, le Conseil extraordinaire «Justice et affaires intérieures», à la suite des attentats terroristes perpétrés à Bruxelles, a insisté sur la nécessité d’accélérer les travaux dans ce domaine ainsi que d’adopter un code de conduite sur les discours de haine en ligne.

La décision-cadre sur la lutte contre certaines formes et manifestations de racisme et de xénophobie au moyen du droit pénal rend punissable l’incitation à la violence ou à la haine visant un groupe de personnes ou un membre d’un tel groupe, défini par référence à la race, la couleur, la religion, l’ascendance, l’origine nationale ou ethnique. C’est sur ce texte que s’appuie la définition des contenus illégaux en ligne.

La liberté d’expression est une valeur européenne fondamentale qui doit être préservée. La Cour européenne des droits de l’homme a rappelé la distinction importante à opérer entre les contenus qui «heurtent, choquent ou inquiètent l’État ou une fraction quelconque de la population» et les contenus véhiculant de véritables et graves incitations à la violence ou à la haine, que les États peuvent sanctionner ou empêcher.

*

Pour en savoir plus:

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: