OMG/GMO : solution for the future ? ( en-fr )


Doc. 12531

25 February 2011

Genetically modified organisms: a solution for the future ?

Version française suit !

Report1

Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs

Rapporteur: Mr Jean-François LE GRAND, France, Group of the European People’s Party


Summary

While, at world level, some non-member countries of the Council of Europe widely authorise GMOs without imposing restrictions, the European Union member countries base their policy on the precautionary principle with a very strict regulatory framework.

However, the first issue raised by GMOs is that of their impact in economic terms and, above all, on health and the environment.

The Parliamentary Assembly notes that there are still differences between the opponents and supporters of GMOs, although developments can be observed in national legislation and procedures.

As part of its ongoing concern to protect the environment and the right of every citizen to live in a healthy environment, and given scientific uncertainty as to the consequences of the use of GMOs, the Assembly recommends that Council of Europe member and non-member states frame and harmonise policies in the fields of public information, consultation and participation regarding the future of GMOs and establish guidelines for good agricultural practice where the production and use of GMOs are concerned.

It also reiterates the need to ensure that expert studies and appraisals concerning GMO issues are performed completely independently and transparently.

A.       Draft resolution2

1.       The use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture continues to be a topic of debate, and all the more so since the issue is not dealt with in the same way from one country to another.

2.       The Parliamentary Assembly notes the diversity of approaches and political and legal solutions, ranging from the American approach based on “substantial equivalence” to the European approach which hinges on the precautionary principle.

3.       The Assembly also refers to the international standards and treaties such as the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, the Codex Alimentarius and the Aarhus Convention, as well as its own Resolution 1419 (2005) on GMOs.

4.       The introduction of GMOs may hinder the capacity of species to adapt and may disrupt relations between them, modifying the natural balance of ecosystems.

5.       GMOs may also give rise to hazards in health, environmental and economic terms. Consequently, it is important to properly study the impact of the coexistence of different forms of cultivation (GMOs, conventional, agrobiological).

6.       However, some experts stress that the development of GMOs and genetically modified plants would help to develop competitive, innovative and sustainable agriculture and protect the environment. They also believe that GMOs could, to a certain degree, help boost the green economy.

7.       The Assembly nevertheless notes that there are numerous and serious risks linked to GMOs in the farming and food sector and draws attention to the need to use genetic engineering technology responsibly and appropriately as a means of increasing agricultural productivity in the world.

8.       The Assembly is aware that many uncertainties remain as to the consequences of the horizontal transfer, by viruses, of genetic materials from GMO crops.

9.       At the same time, it is clear that climate change is increasingly threatening agricultural production owing to rising temperatures, changes in rain cycles and more frequent flooding and drought, and GMOs could, to a certain extent, provide a means of combating famine and the food crisis.

10.       Consequently, the Assembly recommends that Council of Europe member and non-member states:

10.1.       introduce regulations to define good agricultural practice where the production and use of GMOs are concerned;

10.2.       establish documentary traceability, as prescribed in European Directive (EC) No. 1830/2003;

10.3.       frame and harmonise policies in the fields of public information, consultation and participation regarding the future of GMOs;

10.4.       ban the cultivation of GMOs containing antibiotic-resistance marker genes;

10.5.       conduct studies to clarify the impact of the possible transfer of genes from genetically modified crops to human beings;

10.6.       seek to systematically protect biodiversity, particularly in protected natural areas;

10.7.       take the necessary steps to label products containing GMOs or derived from animals fed with GMOs;

10.8.       ensure that all expert studies and appraisals concerning GMO issues are performed completely independently and transparently;

10.9.       ensure the effective independence of European and national health evaluation agencies.

11.       The Assembly also recommends that the European Union guarantee the right of its member states to decide whether or not to cultivate genetically modified plants and, if such cultivations exist, to establish GMO-free zones. 

B.       Explanatory memorandum by Mr Le Grand, rapporteur

Contents

Page

1.       Introduction       4

2.       Policies and legislation on GMOs: a diversity of approaches and solutions       4

2.1.        Worldwide       4

2.2.        In Europe       5

3.       Issues raised by GMOs       5

3.1.        Health safety       5

3.2.       Environmental effects of GMOs       5

4.       GMOs as a possible response to food needs       6

5.       Current issues regarding GMOs – legal aspects       6

6.       The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)       7

7.       Developing a pan-European policy on the use of GMOs for agricultural and commercial purposes       7

1.       Introduction

1.       Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are living organisms (microorganisms, plant or animal) whose genetic material has been altered by man on the basis, for example, of a transgenesis operation.

2.       GMOs are used in agriculture and for consumption (genetically modified livestock and plants) to improve methods and yield in agriculture.

3.       The genetically modified plants (GMPs) most frequently cultivated are soya, maize, cotton and colza. There are two varieties: plants genetically modified to resist a herbicide and those intended to produce an insecticide (Bt).

4.       The main countries cultivating GMOs for commercial purposes are the United States, Argentina, Brazil and Canada.

5.       The Parliamentary Assembly already held a debate on the issue of GMOs in 2005, on the basis of a detailed report presented by Mr Wodarg on behalf of the Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs. The present report will not therefore revisit the subject as a whole, but will draw attention to the latest developments.

6.       In Resolution 1419 (2005) on genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the Assembly set out a series of principles, namely respect for consumers’ and producers’ freedom of choice, preservation of sustainable development in agriculture, the precautionary principle, objectivity of scientific debate, and public participation. There is no longer any need to underline the continuing relevance of these principles or the fact that the main concern today should not be confirming them but, rather, ensuring their application Europe-wide.

2.       Policies and legislation on GMOs: a diversity of approaches and solutions

2.1.       Worldwide

7.       There are several international standards and treaties such as the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements on application of sanitary and phytosanitary measures. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have also drawn up rules and standards in the framework of the Codex Alimentarius. Also worth mentioning is the Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters.

8.       Some non-member countries of the Council of Europe widely authorise GMOs, do not separate flows of goods and do not stipulate any labelling for products derived directly or indirectly from this technology. However, the situation at world level still varies greatly and there are many countries which do not have access to GMOs or do not wish them to spread on their territory.

2.2.       In Europe

9.       As a general rule, in the countries belonging to the European Union, policy is founded on the precautionary principle in a quite strictly enforced regulatory framework, so that few authorisations are recorded (see the procedures for evaluating and authorising genetically modified food and feed and deliberate release into the environment of genetically modified organisms (Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003; Directive 2001/18/EC)).

10.       The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has a considerable role to perform in the development of GMOs. It provides the European Union with scientific advice and information for communication in the field of the risks relating to the food chain, and includes a scientific group on GMOs.

11.       Community law covers, in particular, importing, processing, experimental growing (contained or open field), commercial crops, co-existence of different cultivation methods, traceability and labelling (with regard to the latter two, see Regulation (EC) No. 1830/2003). This Community regulatory apparatus is regarded more or less favourably depending which position one adopts on GMOs. For some it is balanced, for others too severe, for yet others deficient or permissive.

12.       The role of state authorities in the authorisation procedure and in the possible implementation of the safeguard clause appears paramount.

3.       Issues raised by GMOs

13.       It is necessary to compare the benefits and the costs for agriculture and society, and to assess the potential hazards.

14.       There is also the question of compatibility, of consistency with a number of other goals, in particular food safety, that is to say food which is healthy and in adequate supply to feed the entire population without risk.

15.       But it is most important not to disregard the environmental question, especially as regards the effect of pesticides on soils, water, fauna and flora.

16.       This also presupposes thorough scrutiny as to acceptance of costs and liability in the event of pollution or contamination by dissemination, whether accidental or not.

17.       Inter-state relations and the principle of solidarity with developing countries must also be taken into account.

18.       In the context of world recession, the economic implications are paramount, compounded by the impact and the consequences of biotechnologies in this field.

3.1.       Health safety

19.       The first question that arose upon the discovery of GMOs was: what are the human and animal health hazards? In this context, reference should be made to the scale and the health, social, economic and political impact of a number of crises (bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and dioxin).

20.       However, some consider that GMOs could provide a solution to the problems of malnutrition and under-nourishment thanks to the gains in productivity or to enhanced nutritive properties. For instance, Golden Rice was invented as an enriched foodstuff for use in regions with a vitamin A deficiency. According to its inventors, it could offer a response to the suffering of half a million people who go blind every year and the one to two million people who die every year because of vitamin A deficiency.

3.2.       Environmental effects of GMOs

21.       The environmental effects of GMOs warrant special attention, particularly as regards the effects of use of chemical inputs, fertilisers or pesticides and the implications for the preservation of biodiversity (destruction of insects and non-targeted animals, monocultures, large-area crops and deforestation, accidental contamination and also the appearance of potentially invasive resistant species).

22.       It is therefore necessary for the impact of the coexistence of different forms of cultivation (GMOs, conventional, agrobiological) to be studied in greater depth.

23.       Those in favour of developing GMOs and GMPs in Europe claim that such development forms part of the ongoing process of genetically improving plants by exploiting the transgenesis yielded by recent biological discoveries, such as the universality of the genetic code. Development would give access to new genotypes, within the framework of tight and specific regulations. GMPs would be of interest above all in helping to make agriculture competitive, innovative and sustainable, protecting the environment, improving diets in southern countries and, finally, boosting the green economy.

24.       GMOs could open up new avenues in medicine. Growth hormones might be produced by transgenesis, for example, whereas up to now only extracts from the pituitary glands of deceased people have been used for that purpose.

25.       The supporters of GMOs, who fear that Europe might be left isolated from a development which some countries, like the United States or Argentina, are already fully exploiting, believe that “GMO versus environment” is an erroneous logic that should be discarded. They consider the moratoria on GMOs unjustified.

26.       They cite President Obama, who said: “It is about letting scientists … do their jobs …, and listening to what they tell us, even when it’s inconvenient, especially when it’s inconvenient. It is about ensuring that scientific data is never distorted or concealed to serve a political agenda and that we make scientific decisions based on facts, not ideology.” They want European farmers to be able to choose whether or not to grow GMOs and want the precautionary principle to be applied, while at the same time encouraging transparent and safe innovation.

4.       GMOs as a possible response to food needs

27.       The increase in world population and climate change have become two major constraints on agricultural production. According to estimates, the world’s population is likely to number over 9 billion in 2050, which presupposes, in the calculations of the FAO, a 70% increase in world food production.

28.       At the same time, it has been observed that climate change is threatening agricultural production owing to rising temperatures, changes in rain cycles and more frequent flooding and drought, especially in the areas whose climate already makes them subject to natural disasters.

29.       A number of organisations and research teams have sought to identify the technological changes needed in agriculture to meet the food needs of the world population. Their conclusions generally point to the importance of pursuing biotechnology research into the development of genetically modified crops, harnessing it with traditional genetic cross-breeding techniques, exploiting the potential of aquaculture and extending farmlands where extreme environmental conditions prevail (high saline levels, drought, etc).

30.       Some researchers have also suggested developing plants which could use nitrogen in the environment and reduce water pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Accordingly, GMOs could be developed in environments subject to extreme conditions or disrupted by climate change. An FAO study suggests that agriculture is not only a victim of climate change but also itself a contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions.

5.       Current issues regarding GMOs – legal aspects

31.       The differences still remain very marked between opponents and supporters of GMOs, despite the attempts to find and apply a halfway solution.

32.       Development in certain member states’ national legislation and procedures is observed nonetheless.

33.       The European Union has toughened the enforcement of the European Union legal framework on GMOs (Environment Council decision of December 2008, evaluation process initiated by the Directorate General for Health and Consumer Affairs (DG SANCO) in October 2009, report delivered in the summer of 2009).

34.       On 2 March 2010, fresh authorisations were also granted by the European Commission, namely the authorisation to grow the Amflora potato developed by BASF and the authorisations to import three genetically modified maize varieties of the Monsanto Company; the procedures initiated for renewing authorisation of certain GMOs (Mon810 maize) were pending.

35.       France and Germany have already applied the safeguard clause concerning Monsanto 810, and there has been liability litigation in the United States in a case of contamination, which resulted in the award of heavy damages.

36.       On 29 June 2010, European Union agriculture ministers failed to reach agreement by qualified majority on authorising or banning the sale within the European Union of genetically modified maize. On 28 July, the European Commission authorised for ten years the sale of six maize varieties and renewed the authorisation for Monsanto Mon810, for both food and feed purposes. Renewal was granted for Bt11 maize developed by Syngenta, alongside authorisation for five new GM maize varieties (Bt11xGA21 by Syngenta, 1507×59122 by Dow Agrosciences/Pioneer and three others by Monsanto (59122x1507xNK603, Mon88017xMon810 and Mon89034xNk603)).

37.       Human food and animal feed containing GM maize are now therefore authorised for sale throughout the European Union for the next ten years. Only growing them is banned. They supplement the three GM soya varieties, six GM cotton varieties, three GM rape varieties, 17 GM maize varieties and the GM sugar beet already authorised for sale in Europe.

38.       This decision should lead to the still wider circulation of transgene products throughout the European Union.

6.       The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

39.       GMO opponents have raised questions about the existence of serious conflicts of interest within the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is responsible for issuing scientific advice on GMOs.

40.       In 2009, Suzy Renckens, Head of the GMO Unit at the EFSA, joined Syngenta before the expiry of the two-year period required for avoiding conflicts of interest.

41.       On 29 September 2010, it was revealed that Diana Banati, who has chaired the EFSA Management Board since 2008, was also a member of the board of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), an association comprising 400 agric-food players (including Monsanto, Syngenta, DuPont, Nestlé and Kraft Foods).

42.       In this context, it is all the more important that practical measures to ensure the impartiality of European expertise concerning GMOs are taken as a matter of urgency so that environmental assessment in this area is properly strengthened.

7.       Developing a pan-European policy on the use of GMOs for agricultural and commercial purposes

43.       The issue of GMOs directly affects human rights, the right to health, the right to a healthy, sustainable environment, property rights, freedom of enterprise and the right to information.

44.       The Council of Europe, by virtue of its geographical outreach and the scale of agricultural production and marketing in its member states, and especially as a forum of Europe-wide democratic debate, can perform a significant role in the debate about the development of GMOs.

45.       The Parliamentary Assembly has long sought to advance environmental protection. In this context, it would be expedient for the Assembly to urge member and non-member states to frame and harmonise policies in the fields of public information, consultation and participation regarding the future of GMOs.

46.       Given the scientific uncertainty surrounding the consequences of the horizontal transfer, by viruses, of genetic materials from genetically modified crops (including the antibiotic-resistance marker genes present in most GMOs), further large-scale scientific studies should be conducted to clarify the impact of the possible transfer of genes from genetically modified crops to other organisms, including human beings, or bacteria living in them, and to identify means of preventing such transfers.

47.       Given that there are serious doubts about the possibility of ensuring the coexistence of GM and non-GM crops on fields within the same area and that the protection of biodiversity, especially in protected areas, against the horizontal transfer of genes from GM crops should be ensured as a matter of utmost priority, the Assembly should recommend that member states adopt the regulations necessary to guarantee the right of states to decide freely whether or not to cultivate GM plants and, if they so wish, to establish GMO-free zones.

48.       In addition, regulations on a total ban in Europe on the cultivation of GMOs which contain antibiotic-resistance marker genes should be drawn up and implemented. Other precautionary measures should be developed and complied with to the letter, for instance the clear labelling of products containing GMOs (or derived from animals fed with GMOs), the exact labelling of seed, liability regulations and, above all, the definition of agricultural best practice regarding the production and use of GMOs.

49.       The Assembly should also call on states to ensure that all expert studies and appraisals concerning GMO issues are performed completely independently and transparently.


1 Reference to the committee: Doc. 11816, Reference 3532 of 29 May 2009.

2 Draft resolution adopted by the committee on 25 February 2011.

* * * * *

 

Doc. 12531

25 février 2011

Les organismes génétiquement modifiés: une solution pour l’avenir ?

Rapport1

Commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales

Rapporteur: M. Jean-François LE GRAND, France, Groupe du Parti populaire européen


Résumé

S’il est vrai qu’au niveau mondial, certains pays non membres du Conseil de l’Europe autorisent largement et sans contrainte les OGM, les pays membres de l’Union européenne, quant à eux, fondent leur politique sur le principe de précaution avec un cadre réglementaire très strict.

Toutefois la question première qui se pose est celle de savoir quel est l’impact des OGM sur le plan économique mais surtout sur le plan de la santé et de l’environnement.

L’Assemblée parlementaire constate qu’il existe encore des différences entre les opposants et les promoteurs des OGM, même si on observe des évolutions dans les législations et les procédures nationales.

Dans son souci constant de la protection de l’environnement et du droit de chaque citoyen de vivre dans un environnement sain, et face à l’incertitude scientifique quant aux conséquences de l’utilisation des OGM, l’Assemblée recommande aux Etats membres et non membres du Conseil de l’Europe d’encadrer et d’harmoniser leurs politiques dans les domaines de l’information, de la consultation et de la participation du public en ce qui concerne l’avenir des OGM et de mettre en place un guide des bonnes pratiques agricoles en ce qui concerne la production et l’utilisation des OGM.

Elle rappelle également la nécessité de veiller à ce que les études et les expertises concernant la problématique des OGM soient effectuées en toute indépendance et transparence.

A.       Projet de résolution2

1.       L’utilisation des organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) en agriculture continue à faire l’objet de débats, d’autant que cette question n’est pas traitée de façon identique selon les pays.

2.       L’Assemblée parlementaire constate que les approches et les solutions politiques et juridiques sont diverses, variant de l’approche américaine fondée sur «l’équivalence en substances» à l’approche européenne qui repose sur le principe de précaution.

3.       L’Assemblée se réfère également aux normes et traités internationaux tels que le Protocole de Carthagène sur la biosécurité, le Codex Alimentarius et la Convention d’Aarhus ainsi qu’à sa Résolution 1419 (2005) relative aux OGM.

4.       L’introduction d’OGM peut entraver la faculté d’adaptation des espèces et perturber les relations entre elles, modifiant ainsi l’équilibre naturel des écosystèmes.

5.       Les OGM peuvent également entraîner des risques sur le plan sanitaire, environnemental et économique. Il est par conséquent important de bien étudier l’impact de la coexistence des différents modes de culture (OGM, traditionnel, agrobiologique).

6.       Certains experts soulignent cependant que le développement des OGM et des plantes génétiquement modifiées permettrait de contribuer à développer une agriculture compétitive, innovante et durable et de protéger l’environnement. Ils estiment également que les OGM pourraient, dans une certaine mesure, favoriser l’essor de l’économie verte.

7.       L’Assemblée constate toutefois que les risques liés aux OGM dans l’agroalimentaire sont nombreux et graves et elle attire l’attention sur la nécessité d’une utilisation responsable et appropriée de la technologie du génie génétique permettant d’accroître la productivité agricole dans le monde.

8.       L’Assemblée est consciente qu’il existe encore beaucoup d’incertitudes quant aux conséquences du transfert horizontal par des virus, de matériaux génétiques provenant des cultures d’OGM.

9.       Toutefois, il est clair que les changements climatiques menacent de plus en plus la production agricole en raison de la hausse des températures, des changements dans les cycles de pluies, et des inondations et des sécheresses plus fréquentes et les OGM pourraient, ainsi, dans une certaine mesure, être un moyen de lutter contre la famine et la crise alimentaire.

10.       En conséquence, l’Assemblée recommande aux Etats membres et non membres du Conseil de l’Europe:

10.1.       de mettre en place une réglementation portant sur une définition des bonnes pratiques agricoles en ce qui concerne la production et l’utilisation des OGM;

10.2.       de mettre en place une traçabilité documentaire, telle que préconisée dans la Directive européenne (CE) n° 1830/2003;

10.3.       d’encadrer et d’harmoniser leurs politiques dans les domaines de l’information, de la consultation et de la participation du public en ce qui concerne l’avenir des OGM;

10.4.       d’interdire la culture d’OGM contenant des gènes marqueurs de résistance aux antibiotiques;

10.5.       de mener des études visant à préciser l’impact du transfert éventuel de gênes provenant de cultures d’OGM vers les êtres humains;

10.6.       de veiller à protéger systématiquement la biodiversité, notamment dans les espaces naturels protégés;

10.7.       de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour étiqueter les produits contenant des OGM ou issus d’animaux nourris avec des OGM;

10.8.       de veiller à ce que les études et les expertises concernant la problématique des OGM soient effectuées en toute indépendance et transparence;

10.9.       d’assurer l’indépendance effective des agences européennes et nationales d’évaluation sanitaire.

11.       L’Assemblée recommande également à l’Union européenne de garantir le droit à ses Etats membres de décider de cultiver ou non des plantes génétiquement modifiées et, s’il y a des cultures, d’établir des zones sans OGM. 

B.       Exposé des motifs, par M. Le Grand, rapporteur

Sommaire

Page

1.       Introduction       4

2.       Politiques et législations en matière d’OGM: une diversité d’approches et de solutions       4

2.1.        Au niveau mondial       4

2.2.        Au niveau européen       5

3.       Problèmes soulevés par les OGM       5

3.1.        La sécurité sanitaire       5

3.2.        Les effets des OGM sur l’environnement       6

4.       Les OGM – une réponse possible aux besoins alimentaires       6

5.       L’actualité du dossier OGM – aspects juridiques       6

6.        L’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA)       7

7.       Vers une politique paneuropéenne sur l’utilisation à des fins agricoles et commerciales d’OGM?       7

1.       Introduction

1.       Les organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) sont des organismes vivants (micro-organismes, végétaux ou animaux) dont le patrimoine génétique a été modifié par l’homme, à partir, par exemple, d’une opération de transgénèse.

2.       Les OGM sont utilisés dans l’agriculture et pour la consommation (animaux d’élevage et plantes génétiquement modifiés) pour améliorer les techniques et le rendement dans le domaine agricole.

3.       Les plantes génétiquement modifiées (PGM) les plus fréquemment cultivées sont le soja, le maïs, le coton et le colza. Elles sont de deux sortes: les plantes génétiquement modifiées afin de résister à un herbicide et celles destinées à produire un insecticide (Bt).

4.       Les principaux pays cultivant des OGM à des fins commerciales sont les Etats-Unis, l’Argentine, le Brésil et le Canada.

5.       L’Assemblée parlementaire a déjà tenu un débat sur la problématique des OGM en 2005, sur la base d’un rapport détaillé présenté par M. Wodarg au nom de la commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales. Le rapport actuel ne se propose donc pas de reprendre le sujet en son entier, mais plutôt d’attirer l’attention sur les derniers développements.

6.       En effet, par sa Résolution 1419 (2005) sur les organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM), l’Assemblée énonçait une série de principes dont le respect de la liberté de choix pour les consommateurs et les producteurs, la préservation du développement durable en agriculture, le principe de précaution, l’objectivité du débat scientifique et la participation du public. Il n’est plus nécessaire de souligner la pertinence et la pérennité de ces principes ni le fait qu’aujourd’hui on devrait moins se préoccuper de les affirmer que d’en promouvoir l’application à l’échelle continentale.

2.       Politiques et législations en matière d’OGM: une diversité d’approches et de solutions

2.1.       Au niveau mondial

7.       Il existe plusieurs normes et traités internationaux tels que le Protocole de Carthagène sur la biosécurité et les accords de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) sur l’application des mesures sanitaires et phytosanitaires. L’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) et l’Organisation mondiale de la Sante (OMS) ont également élaboré des règles et des normes dans le cadre du Codex Alimentarius. Il est également intéressant de mentionner la Convention d’Aarhus sur l’accès à l’information, la participation du public au processus décisionnel et l’accès à la justice en matière d’environnement.

8.       L’on constate que certains pays non membres du Conseil de l’Europe autorisent largement les OGM, ne séparent pas les filières et n’imposent aucun étiquetage des produits issus directement ou indirectement de cette technologie. Toutefois, la situation à l’échelle mondiale reste encore très contrastée et il existe de nombreux pays qui n’ont pas accès aux OGM ou qui ne souhaitent pas les voir se développer sur leur territoire.

2.2.       Au niveau européen

9.       En règle générale, dans les pays membres de l’Union européenne, la politique est fondée sur le principe de précaution dans un cadre réglementaire et selon une application assez stricte. C’est ainsi que l’on compte peu d’autorisations (voir les procédures d’évaluation et d’autorisation des denrées alimentaires génétiquement modifiés et de dissémination volontaire d’OGM dans l’environnement (Règlement (CE) n° 1829/2003; Directive 2001/18/CE)).

10.       L’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA) a un rôle non négligeable à jouer dans le développement des OGM. Elle est la source de conseils scientifiques et de communication pour l’Union européenne dans le domaine des risques liés à la chaîne alimentaire; elle comporte un groupe scientifique sur les OGM.

11.       Le droit communautaire tient notamment compte de l’importation, de la transformation, des cultures expérimentales (confinées ou en plein champ), des cultures commerciales, de la coexistence des différents modes de culture, de la traçabilité, de l’étiquetage (pour ces deux derniers, voir le Règlement (CE) n° 1830/2003). Cette réglementation communautaire est considérée plus ou moins favorablement selon la position que l’on adopte à l’égard des OGM. Elle serait équilibrée pour certains, trop sévère pour d’autres, lacunaire voire laxiste pour d’autres encore.

12.       Le rôle des Etats lors de la procédure d’autorisation ainsi que dans la mise en œuvre éventuelle de la clause de sauvegarde apparaît comme primordial.

3.       Problèmes soulevés par les OGM 

13.       Il est nécessaire de comparer les bénéfices et les coûts pour l’agriculture et la société et d’évaluer les risques potentiels.

14.       Il se pose également la question de la compatibilité, de l’adéquation avec un certain nombre d’autres objectifs, en particulier la sécurité alimentaire, c’est-à-dire l’alimentation saine et en quantité suffisante pour nourrir sans risque l’ensemble de la population.

15.       Mais il ne faut surtout pas écarter la question environnementale, notamment en ce qui concerne l’effet des pesticides sur les sols, l’eau, ainsi que sur la faune et la flore.

16.       Ceci implique également un examen approfondi quant à la prise en charge des coûts et de la responsabilité en cas de pollution ou de contamination par dissémination, accidentelle ou non.

17.       Il faut, en outre, tenir compte des relations interétatiques ainsi que du principe de solidarité avec les pays en développement.

18.       Dans le contexte de récession mondiale, les implications économiques sont primordiales. A ceci s’ajoutent l’impact et les conséquences des biotechnologies dans ce domaine.

3.1.       La sécurité sanitaire

19.       La première question qui s’est posée à la découverte des OGM est celle des risques sur la santé humaine et animale. Dans ce contexte, l’on doit mentionner l’ampleur et les effets sanitaires, sociaux, économiques et politiques d’un certain nombre de crises (l’encéphalopathie spongiforme bovine (ESB) ou la crise de la dioxine).

20.       Toutefois, certains estiment que les OGM pourraient apporter une solution aux problèmes de malnutrition et de sous-alimentation grâce à des gains de productivité ou à des propriétés nutritionnelles améliorées. Par exemple, le «riz doré» a été inventé comme aliment enrichi pour être utilisé dans les zones qui souffrent d’une carence en vitamine A. Selon ses inventeurs, le «riz doré» pourrait être une réponse à la détresse d’un demi-million de personnes qui chaque année perdent la vue, et d’un à deux millions de personnes qui, chaque année, meurent de carence en vitamine A.

3.2.       Les effets des OGM sur l’environnement

21.       Les effets des OGM sur l’environnement méritent une attention particulière, notamment en ce qui concerne les effets de l’usage d’intrants chimiques, d’engrais ou de pesticides et les conséquences sur le maintien de la biodiversité (destruction d’insectes et d’animaux non-cibles, monocultures, cultures extensives et déforestation, contamination accidentelle, mais également apparition d’espèces résistantes potentiellement envahissantes).

22.       Il est par conséquent nécessaire que l’impact de la coexistence des différents modes de culture (OGM, traditionnel, agrobiologique) soit étudié de manière plus approfondie.

23.       Les partisans du développement des OGM et des PGM en Europe affirment que leur développement s’inscrit dans le processus continu d’amélioration génétique des plantes, en utilisant la transgénèse issue des découvertes biologiques récentes, comme l’universalité du code génétique. Ce développement permettrait l’accès à des caractères génétiques nouveaux, dans le cadre d’une réglementation spécifique rigoureuse. Les PGM présenteraient un intérêt surtout parce qu’ils contribueraient à une agriculture compétitive, innovante et durable, à la protection de l’environnement, à l’amélioration de l’alimentation des pays du Sud et, finalement, à l’essor de l’économie verte.

24.       Les OGM pourraient ouvrir des voies nouvelles dans la médecine. C’est ainsi, par exemple, que des hormones de croissance pourraient être produites par transgénèse, alors que, jusqu’à présent, on n’utilisait dans ce but que des extraits de l’hypophyse des personnes décédées.

25.       Selon les partisans des OGM, qui craignent que l’Europe ne reste en dehors d’une évolution dont des pays comme les Etats-Unis ou l’Argentine tirent déjà pleinement des bénéfices, la logique «OGM contre l’environnement» serait fausse et il faudrait l’abandonner. Les moratoires sur les OGM seraient injustifiés.

26.       Se référant aux paroles du Président Obama, «Il faut écouter ce que les scientifiques ont à nous dire, même si cela dérange, surtout si cela dérange. Il faut faire en sorte que les faits et les preuves ne soient pas déformés ou occultés par la politique et que les décisions scientifiques reposent sur les faits et non l’idéologie», ils souhaitent que les agriculteurs européens aient la possibilité de choisir de cultiver ou non des OGM et qu’on applique le principe de précaution mais en favorisant une innovation transparente et sûre.

4.       Les OGM – une réponse possible aux besoins alimentaires

27.       L’augmentation de la population mondiale et les changements climatiques sont devenus deux contraintes majeures à la production agricole. Selon les estimations, la population mondiale devrait s’élever à plus de 9 milliards en 2050, ce qui suppose, selon la FAO, une augmentation de la production alimentaire mondiale de 70%.

28.       Or, l’on constate que les changements climatiques menacent la production agricole en raison de la hausse des températures, des changements dans les cycles de pluies, et des inondations et des sécheresses plus fréquentes, surtout dans les zones qui sont déjà sujettes à des catastrophes naturelles dues au climat.

29.       Plusieurs organisations et des équipes de chercheurs ont cherché à voir quels étaient les changements technologiques à apporter à l’agriculture pour répondre aux besoins alimentaires de la population mondiale. Dans l’ensemble, les conclusions de ces études montrent l’importance de poursuivre les recherches en biotechnologie pour le développement des cultures OGM en les couplant aux techniques traditionnelles de croisement génétique, en utilisant le potentiel de l’aquaculture et en étendant les zones cultivées dans des conditions environnementales extrêmes (salinité élevée, sécheresse …).

30.       Certains chercheurs ont également proposé de développer les plantes qui pourraient utiliser l’azote dans l’environnement, réduire la pollution de l’eau et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Les OGM peuvent ainsi se développer dans des environnements extrêmes ou perturbés par le changement climatique.

Selon une étude de la FAO, l’on estime que l’agriculture n’est pas seulement une victime du changement climatique, car elle contribue également aux émissions globales des émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

5.       L’actualité du dossier OGM – aspects juridiques

31.       Les différences restent encore très tranchées entre les opposants et les promoteurs des OGM et ce malgré les tentatives de trouver et d’appliquer une solution intermédiaire.

32.       L’on constate toutefois une évolution des législations et des procédures nationales dans certains Etats membres.

33.       L’Union européenne a renforcé la mise en œuvre du cadre juridique de l’Union sur les OGM (décision du Conseil Environnement de décembre 2008, processus d’évaluation lancé par la DG Sanco en octobre 2009, rapport rendu à l’été 2009).

34.       Le 2 mars 2010, de nouvelles autorisations ont également été délivrées par la Commission européenne, à savoir l’autorisation de mise en culture de la pomme de terre Amflora élaborée par BASF, et les autorisations d’importation de trois variétés de maïs génétiquement modifiés de la société Monsanto; les procédures de renouvellement d’autorisation de certains OGM (maïs Mon810) étaient en cours.

35.       La France et l’Allemagne ont déjà appliqué la clause de sauvegarde s’agissant du Monsanto 810 et l’on peut mentionner le contentieux en responsabilité aux Etats-Unis dans un cas de contamination qui a conduit à une condamnation à de lourds dommages et intérêts.

36.       Le 29 juin 2010, les ministres de l’agriculture des pays membres de l’Union européenne n’ont pu se mettre d’accord à la majorité qualifiée pour autoriser ou interdire la commercialisation dans l’Union européenne du maïs génétiquement modifié. Le 28 juillet, la Commission européenne a décidé d’autoriser pour dix ans la commercialisation de six maïs et de renouveler celle du Mon810 de Monsanto, maïs utilisables pour l’alimentation humaine et animale. Le renouvellement a été accordé pour le maïs Bt11 développé par Syngenta ainsi que pour la mise sur le marché de cinq nouveaux maïs OGM: Bt11xGA21 de Syngenta, 1507×59122 de Dow agroscience/Pioneer, et trois autres de Monsanto (59122x1507xNK603, Mon88017xMon810 et Mon89034xNk603).

37.       Les denrées alimentaires et les aliments pour animaux contenant des maïs génétiquement modifiés sont donc désormais autorisés à la commercialisation sur le territoire de l’Union européenne et ce pour les dix ans à venir. Seule leur culture est interdite. Ils complètent ainsi les trois variétés d’OGM de soja, les six cotons, les trois colzas, les 17 maïs et la betterave à sucre déjà autorisées à des fins commerciales en Europe.

38.       Cette décision devrait entraîner une circulation encore bien plus importante des produits transgéniques au sein de l’Union européenne.

6.        L’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA)

39.       Les opposants aux OGM se posent des questions sur l’existence de sérieux conflits d’intérêts au sein de l’EFSA, qui est chargée des avis scientifiques sur les OGM.

40.       En 2009, la responsable de l’évaluation des OGM à l’EFSA, Suzy Renckens, a rejoint la société Syngenta, avant même que ne soit écoulé le délai de deux ans requis pour éviter le conflit d’intérêts.

41.       Le 29 septembre 2010, il a été révélé que Diana Banati, présidente depuis 2008 du Conseil d’administration de l’EFSA, était également membre du Conseil d’administration de l’International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), une association regroupant 400 industriels de l’agroalimentaire (y compris Monsanto, Syngenta, Dupont, Nestlé et Kraft Foods).

42.       Dans ce contexte, il est d’autant plus important que des mesures concrètes destinées à garantir l’impartialité de l’expertise européenne concernant les OGM soient prises en toute urgence, pour aboutir à un véritable renforcement de l’évaluation environnementale dans ce domaine.

7.       Vers une politique paneuropéenne sur l’utilisation à des fins agricoles et commerciales d’OGM?

43.       La problématique des OGM a des incidences directes sur les droits de l’homme: le droit à la santé, le droit à un environnement sain et viable, le droit de propriété, la liberté d’entreprendre, le droit à l’information.

44.       Par son étendue géographique et vu l’importance de la production et du marché agricoles au sein de ses Etats membres, et surtout en tant que forum de débat démocratique paneuropéen, le Conseil de l’Europe peut jouer un rôle non négligeable dans le débat sur le développement des OGM.

45.       L’Assemble parlementaire œuvre depuis de nombreuses années en faveur de la protection de l’environnement. Dans ce contexte, il serait utile qu’elle insiste auprès des Etats membres et non membres pour qu’ils encadrent et harmonisent leurs politiques dans les domaines de l’information, de la consultation et de la participation du public en ce qui concerne l’avenir des OGM.

46.       En effet, à la lumière de l’incertitude scientifique quant aux conséquences du transfert horizontal, par des virus, de matériaux génétiques provenant de cultures OGM (y compris les gènes marqueurs de résistance aux antibiotiques présents dans la plupart des OGM), de nouvelles études scientifiques d’envergure devraient être menées afin de préciser l’impact du transfert éventuel de gènes provenant de cultures d’OGM vers d’autres organismes, y compris vers les êtres humains, ou dans les bactéries qui y sont présentes, et d’identifier les moyens d’éviter un tel transfert.

47.       Compte tenu du fait qu’il existe des doutes sérieux quant à la possibilité de garantir la coexistence de cultures OGM et non-OGM sur des terrains agricoles situés dans la même zone et tenant compte du fait que la protection de la biodiversité, en particulier dans les espaces naturels protégés, contre le transfert horizontal de gènes provenant de cultures OGM doit être garantie avec le plus haut degré de priorité, l’Assemblée devrait recommander aux Etats membres d’adopter la réglementation nécessaire pour garantir le droit d’un Etat de décider librement de cultiver ou non des plantes génétiquement modifiées, ainsi que d’établir, s’il le souhaite, des zones sans OGM.

48.       De plus, une réglementation sur une interdiction totale en Europe de la culture d’OGM contenant des gènes marqueurs de résistance aux antibiotiques devrait être élaborée et mise en place. D’autres mesures de précaution devraient être élaborées et respectées à la lettre, comme, par exemple, l’étiquetage clair des produits contenant des OGM (ou issus d’animaux nourris avec des OGM), l’étiquetage précis des semences, la réglementation de la responsabilité et, surtout, la définition des bonnes pratiques agricoles en ce qui concerne la production et l’utilisation des OGM.

49.       L’Assemblée devrait également inviter les Etats de veiller à ce que toutes les études et les expertises concernant la problématique des OGM soient effectuées en toute indépendance et transparence.


1 Renvoi en commission: Doc. 11816, Renvoi 3532 du 29 mai 2009

2 Projet de résolution adopté par la commission le 25 février 2011.

 Source

 

%d bloggers like this: